Master List of Books Read in 2019

  1. White Girls by Hilton Als.
  2. Still Lives by Maria Hummel.
  3. The Dark Days Deceit by Alison Goodman.
  4. Mass Starvation: The History And Future Of Famine by Alex de Waal.
  5. Girl In The Window by Penny Joelson.
  6. War Is Over by David Almond and David Litchfield.
  7. The Magic Misfits 2: The Second Story by Neil Patrick Harris.
  8. The Empowered Manager by Peter Block.
  9. Grist Mill Road by Christopher J Yates.
  10. The Free-Time Formula by Jeff Sanders.
  11. Egypt by Robert Springborg.
  12. Amelia Fang And The Memory Thief by Laura Ellen Anderson.
  13. The Spy Who Came In From The Cold by John Le Carré.
  14. A Very Large Expanse Of Sea by Tahereh Mafi.
  15. Joe Quinn’s Poltergeist by David Almond and Dave McKean.
  16. The Accidental President by Tom McLaughlin.
  17. Heimat: A German Family Album by Nora Krug.
  18. The Happiness Fantasy by Carl Cederström.
  19. Under The Ice by Rachael Blok.
  20. A Legacy Of Spies by John Le Carré.
  21. Planet Omar: Accidental Trouble Magnet by Zanib Mian.
  22. In Blossom by Yooju Cheon.
  23. Love From Dr Seuss.
  24. Swiss Watching: Inside The Land Of Milk And Honey by Diccon Bewes.
  25. A Story About Cancer (With A Happy Ending) by India Desjardins and Marianne Ferrer.
  26. The La’lun by J N Harris.
  27. Future Politics by Jamie Susskind.
  28. You Can’t Hide by Sarah Mussi.
  29. Unsolved Murders: True Crime Cases Uncovered by Amber Hunt and Emily G. Thompson.
  30. Winners Take All by Anand Giridharadas.
  31. Positive Thinking Pocketbook by Gill Hasson.
  32. To Night Owl From Dogfish by Holly Goldberg Sloan and Meg Wolitzer.
  33. Tell The Machine Goodnight by Katie Williams.
  34. Meet The Penguins by Mike Brownlow.
  35. Spoonbenders by Daryl Gregory.
  36. The Girl With The Shark’s Teeth by Cerrie Burnell.
  37. The Closest Thing To Flying by Gill Lewis.
  38. A Girl Called Justice by Elly Griffiths.
  39. Shattermoon by Dominic Dulley.
  40. The Chain by Adrian McKinty.
  41. Their Little Secret by Mark Billingham.
  42. Empire Of Silence by Christopher Ruocchio.
  43. The Lost by Mari Hannah.
  44. The Last Namsara by Kristen Ciccarelli.
  45. The Feed by Nick Clark Windo.
  46. Lovers And Strangers: An Immigrant History Of Post-War Britain by Clair Wills.
  47. Isadora Moon Has A Sleepover by Harriet Muncaster.
  48. The Good Son by You-Jeong Jeong.
  49. Adventure Duck -v- Power Pug by Steve Cole and Aleksei Bitskoff.
  50. Sunny Side Up: A Story Of Kindness And Joy by Susan Calman.
  51. Between Worlds: Folktales Of Britain & Ireland by Kevin Crossley-Holland.
  52. Against Hate by Carolin Emcke.
  53. Moscow, Midnight by John Simpson.
  54. Marked by Benedict Jacka.
  55. Joe Country by Mick Herron.
  56. Ronan Boyle And The Bridge Of Riddles by Thomas Lennon and John Hendrix.
  57. Astroturf by Matthew Sperling.
  58. Narwhal – Unicorn Of The Sea by Ben Clanton.
  59. Death In The Spotlight by Robin Stevens.
  60. The Joy Of Missing Out: The Art Of Self-Restraint In An Age Of Excess by Svend Brinkmann.
  61. Heartstream by Tom Pollock.
  62. Teen Pioneers – Young People Who Have Changed The World by Ben Hubbard.
  63. Hope For The Best by Jodi Taylor.
  64. AI For Marketing And Product Innovation by A K Pradeep, Andrew Appel and Stan Sthanunathan.
  65. Before She Knew Him by Peter Swanson.
  66. The Alt-Right: What Everyone Needs To Know by George Hawley.
  67. Typography: A Very Short Introduction by Paul Luna.
  68. The Dog Who Saved The World by Ross Welford.
  69. Speak Up! by Laura Coryton.
  70. Amelia Fang And The Half-Moon Holiday by Laura Ellen Anderson.
  71. Cross Purpose by Claire MacLeary.
  72. Bitter Pills: The Global War On Counterfeit Drugs by Muhammad H. Zaman.
  73. The Boxer by Nikesh Shukla.
  74. The Boy Who Steals Houses by C. G. Drews.
  75. Rose, Interrupted by Patrice Lawrence.
  76. Master Your Mind by Roger Seip and Robb Zbierski.
  77. The Demons Of Liberal Democracy by Adrian Pabst.
  78. The Corner Shop: Shopkeepers, The Sharmas And The Making Of Modern Britain by Babita Sharma.
  79. He: A Novel by John Connolly.
  80. Be More RBG by Marilyn Easton.
  81. Step Into Your Power by Jamia Wilson and Andrea Pippins.
  82. Money – Myths, Truths And Alternatives by Mary Mellor.
  83. Adventure Duck vs The Armadillo Army by Steve Cole and Aleksei Bitskoff.
  84. Productivity – Get Motivated, Get Organised And Get Things Done by Gill Hasson.
  85. Isadora Moon Puts On A Show by Harriet Muncaster.
  86. Victorious Century: The United Kingdom, 1800 – 1906 by David Cannadine.
  87. The Scramble For Europe by Stephen Smith.
  88. A Boy And His Dog At The End Of The World by C. A. Fletcher.
  89. Swimming Against The Storm by Jess Butterworth.
  90. Afropean: Notes From Black Europe by Johny Pitts.

Afropean: Notes From Black Europe by Johny Pitts

The Blurb On The Back:

“Afropean.  Here was a space where blackness was taking part in shaping European identity … A continent of Cape Verdean favelas, Algerian flea markets, Surinamese shamanism, German reggae and Moorish castles.  Yes, all this was part of Europe too.”

Afropean is an on-the-ground documentary of the places where Europeans of African descent live their lives.  Setting off from his hometown of Sheffield, Johny Pitts makes his way through Paris, Brussels, Amsterdam, Berlin, Stockholm, Moscow, Rome, Marseille and Lisbon, through council estates, political spaces, train stations, tour groups, and underground arts scenes.

Here is an alternative map of the continent, revealing plural identities and liminal landscapes, from a Cape Verdean shantytown on the outskirts of Lisbon to RInkeby, the eighty per cent Muslim area of Stockholm, from West African students at university in Moscow to the notorious Paris suburb of Clichy-sous-Bois.  A Europe populated by Egyptian nomads, Sudanese restaurateurs, Belgo-Congolese painters.  Their voices speak to Afropean experiences that demand to be heard.

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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Swimming Against The Storm by Jess Butterworth

The Blurb On The Back:

Our land is sinking.  It’s disappearing into the water.  And no one knows how to save it

Twelve-year-old Eliza and her younger sister Avery have lived their entire lives in a small fishing village on the coast of Louisiana, growing up alongside turtles, pelicans and porpoises.  But now, with sea levels rising, their home is at risk of being swept away.

Determined to save the land, Eliza and Avery secretly go searching in the swamp for the dangerous, wolf-life loup-garou.  If they can prove this legendary creature exists, they’re sure that the government will have to protect its habitat – and their community.

But there’s one problem: the loup-garou has never been seen before.  And with a tropical storm approaching and the sisters deep, deep in the swampland, soon it’s not just their home at risk, but their lives as well …

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A Boy And His Dog At The End Of The World by C. A. Fletcher

The Blurb On The Back:

My name’s Griz.

My childhood wasn’t like yours.  I’ve never had friends, and in my whole life I’ve not met enough people to pay a game of football.  My parents told me how crowded the world used to be, before all the people went away.  But we were never lonely on our remote island.  We had each other, and our dogs.

Then the thief came.

There may be no law left except what you make of it.  But if you steal my dog, you can at least expect me to come after you.  Because if we’re not loyal to the things we love, what’s the point? 

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The Scramble For Europe by Stephen Smith

The Blurb On The Back:

From the harrowing situation of migrants trying to cross the Mediterranean in rubber dinghies to the crisis on the US-Mexico border, mass migration is one of the most urgent issues facing our societies today.  At the same time, viable solutions seem ever more remote, with the increasing polarisation of public attitudes and political positions.

In this book, Stephen Smith focuses on ‘young Africa’ – 40 per cent of its population are under fifteen – and a dramatic demographic shift.  Today, 510 million people live inside EU borders, and 1.25 billion in Africa.  In 2050, 450 million Europeans will face 2.5 billion Africans – five times their number.  The demographics are implacable.  The scramble for Europe will become as inexorable as the ‘scramble for Africa’ was at the end of the nineteenth century, when 275 million people lived north and only 100 million lived south of the Mediterranean.  Then it was all about raw materials and national pride, now it is about young Africans seeking a better life on the Old Continent, the island of prosperity within their reach.  If Africa’s migratory patterns follow the historic precedents set by other less developed parts of the world, in thirty years a quarter of Europe’s population will be Afro-Europeans.  Addressing the question of how Europe can cope with an influx of this magnitude, Smith argues for a path between the two extremes of today’s debate.  He advocates migratory policies of ‘good neighbourhood’ equidistant from guilt-Rudder self-denial and nativist egotism.

This sobering analysis of the migration challenges we now face will be essential reading for anyone concerns with the great social and political questions of our time.  

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Victorious Century: The United Kingdom, 1800 – 1906 by David Cannadine

The Blurb On The Back:

To live in Victorian Britain was to experience an astonishing series of changes, of a kind for which there was simply no precedent in the human experience.  This was an exhilarating time, but also a horrifying one.

In his dazzling new book David Cannadine has created a bold, fascinating new interpretation of Victorian Britain.  This was a country which saw itself at the summit of the world.  And yet it was a society also convulsed by doubt, fear and introspection.  Repeatedly, politicians and writers felt themselves to be staring into the abyss and what is seen as an era of irritating self-belief was in practice obsessed by a sense of its own fragility, whether as a great power or as a moral force.  Victorious Century is an extraordinary enjoyable book – its author catches the relish, humour and theatrically of the age, but also the dilemmas of a kind with which we remain familiar today. 

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Isadora Moon Puts On A Show by Harriet Muncaster

The Blurb On The Back:

Isadora Moon is special because she is different

Her mum is a fairy and her dad is a vampire and she is a bit of both.

It’s almost time for the vampire ball, and Isadora can’t wait!  There’s just one problem: she’s got to compete in a talent show with the other vampire children.

Will Isadora be brave enough to perform …?

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Productivity – Get Motivated, Get Organised And Get Things Done by Gill Hasson

The Blurb On The Back:

Get things done in a way that works best for you.</center>

Do you want to get more done with less stress?  Being productive involves finding your own rhythm and getting things done in a way that works best for <u>you</u>; according to your circumstances, your skills and abilities, and the time, energy and resources you have.

Develop your own productivity mindset with a positive, adaptable and flexible approach.

Personal development author Gill Hasson shares her approach to personal productivity – helping you determine what works best for you in prioritising your goals, managing your time and organising your life.  <u>Productivity</u> will help you:

  • Identify what’s stopping you from being more productive
  • Balance your work and personal life
  • Plan your time more purposefully
  • Identify the best time of day to get things done
  • Manage difficulties, stress and setbacks`

Rather than work harder, work smarter.  <u>Productivity</u> show you how!  It explains how to get things done efficiently and effectively on your own terms and in your own way.  

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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Adventure Duck vs The Armadillo Army by Steve Cole and Aleksei Bitskoff

The Blurb On The Back:

The battle is on – duck for cover!

Adventure Duck’s arch nemesis, Power Pug, is back with a sickly-sweet plan for world domination.  With an armadillo army under his command, the evil pug is digging up the rainforest to build a giant chocolate factory!  Can a new llama sidekick help Adventure Duck win the war?  Because defeat means only one thing …

Death by chocolate!

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Money – Myths, Truths And Alternatives by Mary Mellor

The Blurb On The Back:

What does money mean?  Where does it come from and how does it work?

In this highly topical book, Mary Mellor, an expert on money, examines money’s social, political and commercial histories to debunk longstanding myths such as money being in short supply and needing to come from somewhere.

Arguing that money’s immense social value means that its creation and circulation should be a matter of democratic choice, she sets out a new finance system, based on green and feminist concerns, to bring radical change for social good.  

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Step Into Your Power by Jamia Wilson and Andrea Pippins

The Blurb On The Back:

Slay your fear!  Get out of your comfort zone and express yourself.

Find the lesson!  Bounce back from the dumps, failures and other bummers.

Lift as you climb.  Support your squad.

Speak truth: know your rights and take action

Don’t fit in? Pave new ground

Learn how to step into your power with the help of friendly big-sister figure Jamie Wilson.

How do you achieve your dreams?  And what are your rights?  Find out in this friendly guide, with mentoring moments by Jamia Wilson and Andrea Pippins.  This book gives young girls the tools to unlock their power, be themselves, and maybe just change the world.  

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