Master List of Books Read in 2018

  1. How To Hang A Witch by Adriana Mather.
  2. In Pursuit Of Memory: The Fight Against Alzheimer’s by Joseph Jebelli.
  3. The Cruel Prince by Holly Black.
  4. Satellite by Nick Lake.
  5. The City Of Brass by S. A. Chakraborty.
  6. East Of Hounslow by Khurrum Rahman.
  7. The Woman In The Window by A. J. Finn.
  8. Seventeen by Hideo Yokoyama.
  9. Now We Are Dead by Stuart MacBride.
  10. Why Democracies Need Science by Harry Collins & Robert Evans.
  11. Bioinformation by Bronwyn Parry and Beth Greenhough.
  12. Blackbird by N. D. Gomes.
  13. Nancy Parker’s Chilling Conclusions by Julia Lee.
  14. There Was A Country: A Personal History Of Biafra by Chinua Achebe.
  15. Star Wars The Last Jedi: Cobalt Squadron by Elizabeth Wein.
  16. Summary Justice by John Fairfax.
  17. A Spoonful Of Murder by Robin Stevens.
  18. Hackerspaces: Making The Maker Movement by Sarah R. Davies.
  19. Landscape With Invisible Hand by M. T. Anderson.
  20. Can The Euro Be Saved? by Malcolm Sawyer.
  21. London Rules by Mick Herron.
  22. The M&A Formula by Peter Zink Secher and Ian Horley.
  23. Rose Raventhorpe Investigates: Hounds And Hauntings by Janine Beacham.
  24. The Art of Doing Business Across Cultures by Craig Storti.
  25. The Playstation Dreamworld by Alfie Bown.
  26. The Hamilton Affair by Elizabeth Cobbs.
  27. What You Don’t Know by Joann Chaney.
  28. Amelia Fang And The Unicorn Lords by Laura Ellen Anderson.
  29. Horace & Harriet Take On The Town by Clare Elsom.
  30. Do We Need Economic Inequality? by Danny Dorling.
  31. Basic Income And How We Can Make It Happen by Guy Standing.
  32. What Everyone Needs To Know About Tax by James Hannam.
  33. Scythe by Neal Shusterman.
  34. Society Of Fear by Heinz Bude.
  35. The Ascendancy Of Finance by Joseph Vogl.
  36. Flying Tips For Flightless Birds by Kelly McCaughrain.
  37. Ghost Boys by Jewell Parker Rhodes.
  38. Did You See Melody? by Sophie Hannah.
  39. The Echo Killing by Christi Daugherty.
  40. The Confession by Jo Spain.
  41. Zenith by Sasha Alsberg and Lindsay Cummings.
  42. The Whitby Witches by Robin Jarvis.
  43. Syriza In Power by Costas Douzinas.
  44. The Exact Opposite Of Okay by Laura Steven.
  45. Refuge: Transforming A Broken Refugee System by Alexander Betts and Paul Collier.
  46. This Book Will (Help You) Change The World by Sue Turton.
  47. White Rabbit Red Wolf by Tom Pollock.
  48. Rory Branagan: Detective by Andrew Clover and Ralph Lazar.
  49. Purple Hearts by Michael Grant.
  50. The Wonder Of Us by Kim Culbertson.
  51. Can We Solve The Migration Crisis? by Jacqueline Bhabha.
  52. The Colour Of The Sun by David Almond.
  53. The Gender Games by Juno Dawson.
  54. Not If I Save You First by Ally Carter.
  55. The New Scramble For Africa by Pádraig Carmody.
  56. Little Miss Lucky Is Getting Married by Roger Hargreaves, Sarah Daykin, Lizzie Daykin and Liz Bankes.
  57. Small Money, Big Impact: Fighting Poverty With Microfinance by Peter Fanconi and Patrick Scheurle.
  58. Speak No Evil by Uzodinma Iweala.

Speak No Evil by Uzodinma Iweala

The Blurb On The Back:

On the surface, Niru leads a charmed life. Raised by two attentive parents in Washington, DC, he’s a top student and an athletics star at his prestigious private high school.  Bound for Harvard, his prospects are bright.  But Niru has a painful secret: he is gay – an abominable sin to his conservative Nigerian parents.  No one knows except his best friend, Meredith – the one person who seems not to judge him.

When his father accidentally finds out, the fallout is brutal and swift.  Coping with troubles of her own, however, Meredith finds that she has little left emotionally to offer him.  As the two friends struggle to reconcile their desires against the expectations and institutions that seek to define them, they find themselves speeding towards a future more violent and senseless than they can imagine.  Neither will escape unscathed.

Speak No Evil is a novel about the power of words and self-identification, about who gets to speak and who has the power to speak for other people.

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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Small Money, Big Impact: Fighting Poverty With Microfinance by Peter Fanconi and Patrick Scheurle

The Blurb On The Back:

Small Money Big Impact brilliantly illustrates what microfinance is, how it works and all the ways microloans and impact investing can be a socially and financially rewarding asset class.

Impact investing is a global megatrend and is reshaping the way people invest as pension funds, insurance companies, foundations, family offices and private investors jump on board.

However, more than two billion people still lack access to basic financial services so opportunities abound.  This first-of-its-kind guide offers in-depth, yet accessible coverage to making a social and environmental impact, while benefitting from competitive, consistent and uncorrelated returns.  Returns that have proven themselves for well over a decade.

Gain expert-level understanding of both the processes and investment vehicles used in microfinance as well as an awareness of the power this asset class has to enrich the impoverished.

– Explore the global impact investing phenomenon.

– Learn how microloans work, and how they make a difference.

– Discover why investors are increasingly leaning into impact investing.

– Consider the factors that inform impact investing decisions.

Small Money Big Impact has your complete solution to using a small amount of capital to make the world a better place and sustain a robust portfolio. 

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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Little Miss Lucky Is Getting Married by Roger Hargreaves, Sarah Daykin, Lizzie Daykin and Liz Bankes

The Blurb On The Back:

Little Miss Lucky is getting married and she wants to keep it simple and dignified, including the hen do.  But everyone else has other ideas.  Will she survive Little Miss Naughty’s antics and make it to her mother’s dream wedding on time?

The perfect book for any bride-to-be who wonders if they really are the lucky one.

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The New Scramble For Africa by Pádraig Carmody

The Blurb On The Back:

Once marginalized in the world economy, Africa today is a major global supplier of crucial raw materials like oil, uranium and coltan.  China’s part in this story has loomed particularly large in recent years, and the American military footprint on the continent has also expanded.  But a new scramble for resources, markets and territory is now taking place in Africa, involving not just state, but non-state actors, including Islamic fundamentalist and other rebel groups.

The second edition of Pádraig Carmody’s popular book explores the duamics of the new scramble for African resources, markets and territory, and the impact of current investment and competition on people, the environment, and political and economic development on the continent.  Fully revised and updated throughout its chapters explore old and new economic power interest in Africa; oil, minerals, timber, biofuels, land, food and fisheries; and the nature and impacts of Asian and South African investment in manufacturing and other sectors.

The New Scramble For Africa will be essential reading for students of African studies, international relations and resource politics, as well as anyone interested in current affairs.

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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Not If I Save You First by Ally Carter

The Blurb On The Back:

Dear Logan,

Someday I’m going to write a book: How Not to Die in Alaska – A Girl’s Guide to Fashionable Survival.

I bet you don’t know that a hair pin can make an excellent fishing hook.  You may think you can use just any kind of mud masks, but trust me, you CAN’T! in a pinch, nothing starts a fire like nail polish remover.

Alaska is tough.  You might know this, if you ever replied to my letters …  

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The Gender Games by Juno Dawson

The Blurb On The Back:

”It’s a boy!” or “It’s a girl!” are the first words almost all of us hear when we enter the world.  Before our names, before we have likes and dislikes – before we, or anyone else, have any idea who we are.  And two years ago, as Juno Dawson went to tell her mother she was (and actually, always had been) a woman, she started to realise just how wrong we’ve been getting it.

Gender isn’t just screwing over trans people, it’s messing with everyone.  From little girls who think they can’t be doctors to teenagers who come to expect street harassment.  From exclusionist feminists to ‘alt-right’ young men.  From men who can’t cry to the women who think they shouldn’t.  As her body gets in line with her mind, Juno tells not only her own story, but the story of everyone who is shaped by society’s expectations of gender – and what we can do about it.  

Featuring insights from well-known gender, feminist and trans activists including Rebecca Root, Laura Bates, Gemma Cairney, Anthony Anaxagorou, Hannah Witton, Alaska Thunderfuck and many more, The Gender Games is a frank, witty and powerful manifesto for a world in which everyone can truly be themselves.

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The Colour Of The Sun by David Almond

The Blurb On The Back:

One hot summer morning, Davie steps boldly out of his front door.  The world he enters is very familiar – the little Tyneside town that has always been his home – but as the day passes, it becomes ever more dramatic and strange.

A boy has been killed, and Davie thinks he might know who is responsible.  He turns away from the gossip and excitement and sets off roaming towards the sunlit summit at the top of the town, where the real and imaginary world begin to blur.

Davie sees things on the hillside that show him that amongst immorality, there can be kindness and in darkness, there is a chance for hope.  

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Can We Solve The Migration Crisis? by Jacqueline Bhabha

The Blurb On The Back:

Every minute 24 people are forced to leave their homes; currently, more than 65 million are displaced worldwide.  Small wonder that tackling the refugee and migration crisis has become a global political priority.

Can this crisis be resolved and, if so, how?  In this compelling essay, Jacqueline Bhabha explains why forced migration demands compassion, generosity, and a vigorous acknowledgement of our shared dependence on human mobility as a key element of global collaboration.  Unless we develop humane “win-win” strategies for tackling the inequalities and conflicts driving migration and for addressing the fears fuelling xenophobia, innocent lives and cardinal human rights principles will be squandered in the service of futile nationalism and oppressive border control.  

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The Wonder Of Us by Kim Culbertson

The Blurb On The Back:

Abby and Riya are:

best friends

complete opposites

living on different continents

currently mad at each other

about to travel around Europe

Since Riya moved away with her family to Berlin, she and Abby have struggled to be there for one another, and they haven’t spoken in weeks.  But Riya is pretty sure she knows the perfect way to make things better – a grand tour of European cities.  Two weeks, six countries, unimaginable fun.

Can the lush countrysides and dazzling cities of Europe fix their friendship, or does growing up mean growing apart?

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Purple Hearts by Michael Grant

The Blurb On The Back:

Could women fight?

Stupid question.  Women don’t stop being women, and men don’t stop being men.  We become an entirely new creature: the combat soldier. And we are none of us, men or women, the people we started out as.

War is hell.

1944.  It feels like the war will never end.Rio, Frangie and Rainy have all received accolades, been “heroes”, earned promotion. They’ve all done “enough” to allow them to leave this nightmare and go home.  But the war hasn’t finished with them yet …  

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