Master List of Books Read in 2019

  1. White Girls by Hilton Als.
  2. Still Lives by Maria Hummel.
  3. The Dark Days Deceit by Alison Goodman.
  4. Mass Starvation: The History And Future Of Famine by Alex de Waal.
  5. Girl In The Window by Penny Joelson.
  6. War Is Over by David Almond and David Litchfield.
  7. The Magic Misfits 2: The Second Story by Neil Patrick Harris.
  8. The Empowered Manager by Peter Block.
  9. Grist Mill Road by Christopher J Yates.
  10. The Free-Time Formula by Jeff Sanders.
  11. Egypt by Robert Springborg.
  12. Amelia Fang And The Memory Thief by Laura Ellen Anderson.
  13. The Spy Who Came In From The Cold by John Le Carré.
  14. A Very Large Expanse Of Sea by Tahereh Mafi.
  15. Joe Quinn’s Poltergeist by David Almond and Dave McKean.
  16. The Accidental President by Tom McLaughlin.
  17. Heimat: A German Family Album by Nora Krug.
  18. The Happiness Fantasy by Carl Cederström.
  19. Under The Ice by Rachael Blok.
  20. A Legacy Of Spies by John Le Carré.
  21. Planet Omar: Accidental Trouble Magnet by Zanib Mian.
  22. In Blossom by Yooju Cheon.
  23. Love From Dr Seuss.
  24. Swiss Watching: Inside The Land Of Milk And Honey by Diccon Bewes.
  25. A Story About Cancer (With A Happy Ending) by India Desjardins and Marianne Ferrer.
  26. The La’lun by J N Harris.
  27. Future Politics by Jamie Susskind.
  28. You Can’t Hide by Sarah Mussi.
  29. Unsolved Murders: True Crime Cases Uncovered by Amber Hunt and Emily G. Thompson.
  30. Winners Take All by Anand Giridharadas.
  31. Positive Thinking Pocketbook by Gill Hasson.
  32. To Night Owl From Dogfish by Holly Goldberg Sloan and Meg Wolitzer.
  33. Tell The Machine Goodnight by Katie Williams.
  34. Meet The Penguins by Mike Brownlow.
  35. Spoonbenders by Daryl Gregory.
  36. The Girl With The Shark’s Teeth by Cerrie Burnell.
  37. The Closest Thing To Flying by Gill Lewis.
  38. A Girl Called Justice by Elly Griffiths.
  39. Shattermoon by Dominic Dulley.
  40. The Chain by Adrian McKinty.
  41. Their Little Secret by Mark Billingham.
  42. Empire Of Silence by Christopher Ruocchio.
  43. The Lost by Mari Hannah.
  44. The Last Namsara by Kristen Ciccarelli.
  45. The Feed by Nick Clark Windo.
  46. Lovers And Strangers: An Immigrant History Of Post-War Britain by Clair Wills.
  47. Isadora Moon Has A Sleepover by Harriet Muncaster.
  48. The Good Son by You-Jeong Jeong.
  49. Adventure Duck -v- Power Pug by Steve Cole and Aleksei Bitskoff.
  50. Sunny Side Up: A Story Of Kindness And Joy by Susan Calman.
  51. Between Worlds: Folktales Of Britain & Ireland by Kevin Crossley-Holland.
  52. Against Hate by Carolin Emcke.
  53. Moscow, Midnight by John Simpson.
  54. Marked by Benedict Jacka.
  55. Joe Country by Mick Herron.
  56. Ronan Boyle And The Bridge Of Riddles by Thomas Lennon and John Hendrix.
  57. Astroturf by Matthew Sperling.
  58. Narwhal – Unicorn Of The Sea by Ben Clanton.
  59. Death In The Spotlight by Robin Stevens.
  60. The Joy Of Missing Out: The Art Of Self-Restraint In An Age Of Excess by Svend Brinkmann.
  61. Heartstream by Tom Pollock.
  62. Teen Pioneers – Young People Who Have Changed The World by Ben Hubbard.
  63. Hope For The Best by Jodi Taylor.
  64. AI For Marketing And Product Innovation by A K Pradeep, Andrew Appel and Stan Sthanunathan.
  65. Before She Knew Him by Peter Swanson.
  66. The Alt-Right: What Everyone Needs To Know by George Hawley.
  67. Typography: A Very Short Introduction by Paul Luna.
  68. The Dog Who Saved The World by Ross Welford.
  69. Speak Up! by Laura Coryton.
  70. Amelia Fang And The Half-Moon Holiday by Laura Ellen Anderson.
  71. Cross Purpose by Claire MacLeary.
  72. Bitter Pills: The Global War On Counterfeit Drugs by Muhammad H. Zaman.
  73. The Boxer by Nikesh Shukla.
  74. The Boy Who Steals Houses by C. G. Drews.
  75. Rose, Interrupted by Patrice Lawrence.
  76. Master Your Mind by Roger Seip and Robb Zbierski.
  77. The Demons Of Liberal Democracy by Adrian Pabst.
  78. The Corner Shop: Shopkeepers, The Sharmas And The Making Of Modern Britain by Babita Sharma.
  79. He: A Novel by John Connolly.
  80. Be More RBG by Marilyn Easton.
  81. Step Into Your Power by Jamia Wilson and Andrea Pippins.
  82. Money – Myths, Truths And Alternatives by Mary Mellor.
  83. Adventure Duck vs The Armadillo Army by Steve Cole and Aleksei Bitskoff.
  84. Productivity – Get Motivated, Get Organised And Get Things Done by Gill Hasson.
  85. Isadora Moon Puts On A Show by Harriet Muncaster.
  86. Victorious Century: The United Kingdom, 1800 – 1906 by David Cannadine.
  87. The Scramble For Europe by Stephen Smith.
  88. A Boy And His Dog At The End Of The World by C. A. Fletcher.
  89. Swimming Against The Storm by Jess Butterworth.
  90. Afropean: Notes From Black Europe by Johny Pitts.
  91. The Taking Of Annie Thorne by C. J. Tudor.
  92. Bulletproof Problem Solving: The One Skill That Changes Everything by Charles Conn and Robert McLean.
  93. Chernobyl: History Of A Tragedy by Serhii Plokhy.
  94. The Aunt Who Wouldn’t Die by Shirshendu Mukhopadhyay.
  95. What Do We Know And What Should We Do About Immigration? by Jonathan Portes.
  96. The Alice Encounter by John Gribbin.
  97. The Scientific Method by Massimiliano Di Ventra.
  98. A Strange Kind Of Brave by Sarah Moore Fitzgerald.
  99. Unlocking Creativity by Michael A. Roberto.
  100. The Land Of Roar by Jenny McLachlan.
  101. There Is No Planet B by Mike Berners-Lee.
  102. Places In The Darkness by Chris Brookmyre.
  103. The Art Of Communication by Judy Apps.
  104. Halo Moon by Sharon Cohen.
  105. The Economics Of Arrival: Ideas For A Grown Up Economy by Katherine Trebeck and Jeremy Williams.
  106. Pretend You’re Safe by Alexandra Ivy.
  107. Boot by Shane Hegarty.
  108. Kingdom Of Souls by Rena Barron.
  109. Snowblind by Ragnar Jónasson.
  110. Artificial Intelligence In Practice by Bernard Marr and Matt Ward.
  111. No Bad Deed by Heather Chavez.
  112. The Blood by E. S. Thomson.
  113. A Good Girl’s Guide To Murder by Holly Jackson.
  114. Hired: Undercover In Low-Wage Britain by James Bloodworth.

Hired: Undercover In Low-Wage Britain by James Bloodworth

The Blurb On The Back:

Zero-hours contracts and the gig economy have redefined the relationship between companies and their workers: for many, careers are low-paid and high-risk, a series of short-term jobs with no security and little future.  In this essential exposé, James Bloodworth goes undercover to investigate how working life has become a waking nightmare.  From the Orwellian reach of an Amazon warehouse and the high-turnover rate of a telesales factory in Wales to the time trials of a council care worker and the grim reality behind the glossy Uber App, Hired is a clear-eyed analysis of a divided nation and a riveting dispatch from the very frontline of low-wage Britain. 

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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A Good Girl’s Guide To Murder by Holly Jackson

The Blurb On The Back:

The case is closed.

Five years ago, schoolgirl Andie Bell was murdered by Sal Singh. The police know he did it.  Everyone in town knows he did it.

But having grown up in the same small town that was consumed by the murder, Pippa Fitz-Amobi isn’t so sure.  When she chooses the case as the topic for her final-year project, she starts to uncover secrets that someone in town desperately wants to stay hidden.  And if the real killer is still out there, how far will they go to keep Pip from the truth? 

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The Blood by E. S. Thomson

The Blurb On The Back:

I know the smell of death well enough.  But here the sweetness of decay was tainted with something else, something new and different.  It was a curious, moist smell: a smell that spoke of the ooze and slap of water, of gurgling wet spaces and the sticky, yielding mud of low-tide.

Summoned to the riverside by the desperate, scribbled note of an old friend, Jem Flockhart and Will Quartermain board the seaman’s floating hospital, an old hulk known only as The Blood, where prejudice, ambition and murder are rife.

Embroiled in a dark and terrible mystery, Jem and Will embark on a quest to find the truth – but can they uncover the ship’s secrets?  

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No Bad Deed by Heather Chavez

The Blurb On The Back:

You’re driving home from work to your husband and children.

Suddenly a woman is in front of your car.  She’s being attacked.

You call the police and they tell you to stay in your car.

But what if you got out to help?  What might the consequences be?

You save the woman, but the attacker takes your handbag.  And your car.

And then, the next day, when you think it’s all over, your husband disappears.

He’s gone without a trace.

And then he texts you.  I’m sorry.

But is it really him?

Nothing could prepare you for what happens next …

Driving home one rainy night, Cassie Larkin sees a man attacking a woman on the side of the road and makes a split-second decision that will throw her sedate suburban life into chaos.  Against all reason and advice, she gets out of her car to help.

She saves the woman, but while she helps the victim, the attacker steals her car.  Now he has her name.  Her address.  And he knows about her children.

The next day – Halloween – her husband disappears while trick-or-treating with their six-year-old daughter.  Are these disturbing events a coincidence or the beginning of a horrifying nightmare?

As she desperately searches for answers, Cassie discovers that nothing is as random as it seems, and that she is more than willing to fight – to go to the most terrifying extremes – to save her family and her marriage.  

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Artificial Intelligence In Practice by Bernard Marr and Matt Ward

The Blurb On The Back:

Adopt AI-solutions to meet real-world business problems.

Artificial Intelligence In Practice is a practical resource that demystifies how Artificial Intelligence (AI) and machine learning can be used to solve common business challenges and open the door to opportunities that often exceed expectations.  The book is filled with insights from some of the most important AI giants including Google, Microsoft, Amazon, ALibaba, and other forward thinking industry leaders.  It also presents compelling case studies from traditional businesses and startups, that detail how AI is being applied in the real world of business. 

Bestselling author and AI expert Bernard Marr offers detailed examinations of 50 companies that have successfully integrated AI into their business practices.  He provides an overview of each company, describes the specific problem AI addressed and explains how AI offered a workable solution.  Each case study contains a comprehensive overview, some technical details as well as key learning summaries.

Artificial intelligence and machine learning are the most important modern business trends that are driving today’s (and tomorrow’s) successes.  As the book’s myriad cases demonstrate, AI can be used in industries ranging from banking and finance to media and marketing.  By adopting AI technology, any business, no matter what size, sector or industry, can advance innovative solutions to their most demanding challenges.  

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Snowblind by Ragnar Jónasson

The Blurb On The Back:

Siglufjörour: an idyllically quiet fishing village in Northern Iceland, where no one locks their doors – accessible only via a small mountain tunnel.

Ari Thór Arason: a rookie policeman on his first posting, far from his girlfriend in Reykjavik – with a past that he’s unable to leave behind.

When a young woman is found lying half-naked in the snow, bleeding and unconscious, and a highly esteemed, elderly writer falls to his death in the local theatre, Ari is dragged straight into the heart of a community where he can trust no one and secrets and lies are a way of life.

An avalanche and unremitting snowstorms close the mountain pass, and the 24-hour darkness threatens to push Ari over the edge, as curtains begin to twitch, and his investigation becomes increasingly complex, chilling and personal.  Past plays tag with the present and the claustrophobic tension mounts, while Ari is thrust even deeper into his own darkness – blinded by snow, and with a killer on the loose.  

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Kingdom Of Souls by Rena Barron

The Blurb On The Back:

Grandmother said I will be a powerful witch doctor one day.

But I cannot wait that long.

Arrah’s fate was foretold in the bones.

Descended from a long line of powerful witch doctors, she is desperate for a taste of magic.  No matter what the cost.

As strange premonitions and spirits descend upon the Kingdom, Arrah discovers she will do anything to save her people – even if it means sacrificing years of her own life.

Arrah must find a way to master this borrowed power.  But how much time does she have left? 

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Boot by Shane Hegarty

The Blurb On The Back:

When toy robot, Boot, wakes up at a scrapyard it has no idea how it got there and why it isn’t with its owner, Beth.  It only has two and a half glitchy memories but it knows it was loved, which seems important.

Boot is scared but tries to be brave, which is hard when your screen keeps showing a wobbly, worried face.  Luckily Boot meets Noke and Red who have learned to survive in secret.

With its new friends by its side, Boot and the gang set off on a dangerous adventure to find their way home. 

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Pretend You’re Safe by Alexandra Ivy

The Blurb On The Back:

Jaci Patterson was sixteen when she found the first locket on her porch.

Inside were a few strands of hair wrapped around a scrap of bloodstained ribbon.  Though the ‘gifts’ kept arriving, no one believed her hunch that a serial killer was at work.

Now Jaci has finally returned home – only for bodies of strangled victims to start appearing years after the disappeared.

Her nightmare is beginning all over again.  And this time it won’t end until the murderer makes Jaci his … for ever.

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The Economics Of Arrival: Ideas For A Grown Up Economy by Katherine Trebeck and Jeremy Williams

The Blurb On The Back:

What do we want from economic growth?  What sort of a society are we aiming for?  In everyday economics, there is no such thing as enough, or too much, growth.  Yet in the world’s most developed countries, growth has already brought unrivalled prosperity: we have ‘Arrived’.

More than that, through debt, inequality, climate change and fractured politics, the fruits of growth may rot before everyone has a chance to enjoy them.  It’s high time to ask where progress is taking us, and are we nearly there yet?

In fact, Trebeck and Williams claim in this ground-breaking book, the challenge is now to make ourselves at home with this wealth, and to ensure, in the interests of equality, that everyone is included. They explore the possibility of ‘Arrival’, urging us to move from enlarging the economy to improving it, and the benefits this would bring for all. 

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