Master List of Books Read In 2017

  1. The Pale Criminal by Philip Kerr.
  2. A German Requiem by Philip Kerr.
  3. Fish Boy by Chloe Daykin.
  4. The Girl Before by J. P. Delaney.
  5. He Said/She Said by Erin Kelly.
  6. The Bear And The Nightingale by Katherine Arden.
  7. Sirens by Joseph Knox.
  8. Police At The Station And They Don’t Look Friendly by Adrian McKinty.
  9. Nothing But A Circus: Misadventures Among The Powerful by Daniel Levin.
  10. Is Islam An Enemy Of The West? by Tamara Sonn.
  11. The Dark Days Pact by Alison Goodman.
  12. Corpus by Rory Clements.
  13. Nancy Parker’s Spooky Speculations by Julia Lee.
  14. Slow Horses by Mick Herron.
  15. Dead Lions by Mick Herron.
  16. Real Tigers by Mick Herron.
  17. Spook Street by Mick Herron.
  18. Hoffer by Tim Glencross.
  19. Perdido Street Station by China Mieville.
  20. Perfect Remains by Helen Fields.
  21. Prussian Blue by Philip Kerr.
  22. Strange The Dreamer by Laini Taylor.
  23. Fragile Lives by Stephen Westaby.
  24. The Red Queen by Philippa Gregory.
  25. A Twist Of The Knife by Becky Masterman.
  26. Crimson Lake by Candice Fox.
  27. The Legacy by Yrsa Sigurdardottir.
  28. The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas.
  29. Fever by Mary Beth Keane.
  30. What Remains Of Me by A. L. Gaylin.
  31. The Cruelty by Scott Bergstrom.
  32. Tease by Amanda Maciel.
  33. The Eye Of Minds by James Dashner.
  34. The Plague Charmer by Karen Maitland.
  35. Beneath The Surface by Jo Spain.
  36. Seven For A Secret by Lyndsay Faye.
  37. They Can’t Kill Us All: The Story Of Black Lives Matter by Wesley Lowery.
  38. Truevine by Beth Macy.
  39. The Last Act Of Hattie Hoffman by Mindy Mejia.
  40. Cast Iron by Peter May.
  41. Is Science Racist? by Jonathan Marks.
  42. A Handful Of Ashes by Rob McCarthy.
  43. The Fix by Liam Vaughan and Gavin Finch.
  44. Cream Buns And Crime by Robin Stevens.
  45. Why Wall Street Matters by William D. Cohan.
  46. Sometimes I Lie by Alice Feeney.
  47. The Watcher by Ross Armstrong.
  48. Symphony For The City Of The Dead: Dmitri Shostakovich and the Siege of Leningrad by M. T. Anderson.
  49. From Darkest Skies by Sam Peters.
  50. The Break Down by B. A. Paris.
  51. The Glorious Heresies by Lisa McInerney.
  52. Goodly And Grave In A Bad Case Of Kidnap by Justine Windsor.
  53. The Book Of Phoenix by Nnedi Okorafor.
  54. The Blood Miracles by Lisa McInerney.
  55. Faeries, Fiends & Flying Saucers edited by Kirsty Capes.
  56. Beyond The Wall by Tanya Landman.
  57. A Dark So Deadly by Stuart MacBride.
  58. Saint Death by Marcus Sedgwick.
  59. A Crime In The Family by Sacha Batthyany.
  60. Running Blind by Desmond Bagley.
  61. The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl by Shannon Hale and Dean Hale.
  62. The Cleaner by Elisabeth Herrmann.
  63. The Ice by Laline Paull.
  64. The Special Girls by Isabelle Grey.
  65. Bound by Benedict Jacka.
  66. Spellslinger by Sebastien de Castell.
  67. The Fourth Monkey by J. D. Barker.
  68. Islam: The Essentials by Tariq Ramadan.
  69. Bad Choices: How Algorithms Can Help You Think Smarter And Live Happier by Ali Almossawi.
  70. Big Capital: Who’s London For? by Anna Minton.
  71. Before The Fall by Noah Hawley.
  72. What It Means When A Man Falls From The Sky by Lesley Nneka Arimah.
  73. Gender, Politics And News: A Game Of Three Sides by Karen Ross.
  74. Quieter Than Killing by Sarah Hilary.
  75. The Chalk Pit by Elly Griffiths.
  76. The Blade Itself by Joe Abercrombie.
  77. Gather The Daughters by Jennie Melamed.
  78. Girlhood by Cat Clarke.
  79. Last Stop Tokyo by James Buckler.
  80. The House by Simon Lelic.
  81. Three Days And A Life by Pierre Lemaitre.
  82. The Party by Elizabeth Day.
  83. From Prejudice To Pride: A History Of The LGBTQ+ Movement by Amy Lamé.
  84. Before This Is Over by Amanda Hickie.
  85. Suffragettes And The Fight For The Vote by Sarah Ridley.
  86. Blackwing by Ed McDonald.
  87. Playing With Death by Simon Scarrow and Lee Francis.
  88. S.T.A.G.S. by M. A. Bennett.
  89. Before They Are Hanged by Joe Abercrombie.
  90. The Cutaway by Christina Kovac.
  91. 101 Ways To Win An Election by Mark Pack and Edward Maxfield.
  92. Silver Stars by Michael Grant.
  93. The Stars Are Legion by Kameron Hurley.
  94. The Force by Don Winslow.
  95. The Marsh King’s Daughter by Karen Dionne.
  96. Your Life In My Hands: A Junior Doctor’s Story by Rachel Clarke.
  97. Can The Internet Strengthen Democracy? by Stephen Coleman.
  98. Will Robots Take Your Job? by Nigel M. de S. Cameron.
  99. Will China’s Economy Collapse? by Ann Lee.
  100. The Waking Land by Callie Bates.
  101. The Memory Book by Lara Avery.
  102. The Taste Of Blue Light by Lydia Ruffles.
  103. Show Stopper by Hayley Barker.
  104. How To Murder By Your Life by Cat Marnell.
  105. The President’s Gardens by Muhsin Al-Ramli.
  106. The Dark Net by Benjamin Percy.
  107. Fever by Deon Meyer.
  108. Woman Of State by Simon Berthon.
  109. The Irregular by H. B. Lyle.
  110. Six Wakes by Mur Lafferty.
  111. Flame In The Mist by Renée Ahdieh.
  112. IQ by Joe Ide.
  113. Shadow Man by Margaret Kirk.
  114. My Absolute Darling by Gabriel Tallent.
  115. Without A Word by Kate McQuaile.
  116. The Devil’s Claw by Lara Dearman.
  117. Cruel Mercy by David Mark.
  118. I Am Behind You by John Ajvide Lindqvist.
  119. The Money Formula: Dodgy Finance, Pseudo Science And How Mathematicians Took Over The Markets by Paul Wilmott and David Orrell.
  120. The Loneliest Girl in The Universe by Lauren James.
  121. The Furthest Station by Ben Aaronovitch.
  122. Last Argument Of Kings by Joe Abercrombie.
  123. The Strange Disappearance Of A Bollywood Star by Vaseem Khan.
  124. The Future Of Diplomacy by Philip Seib.
  125. Genuine Fraud by E. Lockhart.
  126. There May Be A Castle by Piers Torday.
  127. The Way Of The Strangers: Encounters With The Islamic State by Graeme Wood.
  128. The Pharmaceutical Studies Reader edited by Sergio Sismondo and Jeremy A. Greene.
  129. The Huntress: Sea by Sarah Driver.
  130. The Warrior In The Mist by Ruth Eastham.
  131. Love And Gelato by Jenna Evans Welch.
  132. The Midnight Peacock by Katherine Woodfine.
  133. I Am Traitor by Sif Sigmarsdóttir.
  134. Monstress Volume One: Awakening by Marjorie Liu and Sana Takeda.
  135. Little Secrets by Anna Snoekstra.
  136. The Twelve Lives Of Samuel Hawley by Hannah Tinti.
  137. The Bloodprint by Ausma Zehanat Khan.
  138. The Unwomanly Face Of War by Svetlana Alexievich.
  139. The Impossible by Mark Illis.
  140. Blame by Jeff Abbott.
  141. Nairobi Heat by Mukoma Wa Ngugi.

Nairobi Heat by Mukoma Wa Ngugi

The Blurb On The Back:

A cop from Wisconsin pursues a killer through the terrifying slums of Nairobi and the memories of genocide.

In Madison, Wisconsin, it’s a big deal when African peace activist Joshua Hakizimana – who saved hundreds of people from the Rwandan genocide – accepts a position at the university to teach about “genocide and testimony”.  Then a young woman is found murdered on his doorstep.

Local police Detective Ishmael – an African-American in an “extremely white” town – suspects the crime is racially motivated; the Ku Klux Klan still holds rallies there, after all.  But then he gets a mysterious phone call: “If you want the truth, you must go to its source.  The truth is in the past.  Come to Nairobi.”

It’s the beginning of a journey that will take him to a place still vibrating from the genocide that happened around its borders, where violence is a part of everyday life, where big-oil money rules and where the local cops shoot first and ask questions later – a place, in short, where knowing the truth about history can get you killed.  

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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Blame by Jeff Abbott

The Blurb On The Back:

The crash that killed him

Two years ago, Jane Norton crashed her car on a lonely road, killing her friend David and leaving her with amnesia.  At first, everyone was sympathetic.  Then they found Jane’s note: I wish we were dead together.

A girl to blame

From that day, the town turned against her.  But even now Jane is filled with questions: why were they on that road?  Why was she with David?  Did she really want to die?

The secrets she should forget

Most of all, she must find out who has just written an anonymous message: <u>I know what really happened.  I know what you don’t remember.

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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The Impossible by Mark Illis

The Blurb On The Back:

Bored?  Confused?  Desperate for something – anything – exciting to happen?

So is Hector Coleman.  (And, yes, he does also have the worst name in history).

But unlike you, Hector is hanging from a windowsill five metres up, and his life is about to change in unbelievable ways.

If he doesn’t die first.

Want to find out why?  Open this book.  Hector will tell you.  He’ll tell you that the impossible …

Just got real.

A comic-book-inspired adventure with a graphic-novel twist that will make you grateful your life is not as weird as Hector’s …  

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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The Unwomanly Face Of War by Svetlana Alexievich

The Blurb On The Back:

Bringing together dozens of voices in her distinctive style, The Unwomanly Face Of War is Svetlana Alexievich’s collection of stories from Soviet women who lived through the Second World War: on the front lines, on the home front, and in occupied territories.  As Alexievich gives voice to women who are absent from official narratives – captains, sergeants, nurses, snipers, pilots – she shows us a new version of the war we’re so familiar with, creating an extraordinary alternative history from their private stories.

Published in 1985 in Russia and now available in English for the first time, The Unwomanly Face Of War was Alexievich’s first book and a huge bestseller in the Soviet Union, establishing her as a brilliantly revolutionary writer.  

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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