Master List of Books Read in 2018

  1. How To Hang A Witch by Adriana Mather.
  2. In Pursuit Of Memory: The Fight Against Alzheimer’s by Joseph Jebelli.
  3. The Cruel Prince by Holly Black.
  4. Satellite by Nick Lake.
  5. The City Of Brass by S. A. Chakraborty.
  6. East Of Hounslow by Khurrum Rahman.
  7. The Woman In The Window by A. J. Finn.
  8. Seventeen by Hideo Yokoyama.
  9. Now We Are Dead by Stuart MacBride.
  10. Why Democracies Need Science by Harry Collins & Robert Evans.
  11. Bioinformation by Bronwyn Parry and Beth Greenhough.
  12. Blackbird by N. D. Gomes.
  13. Nancy Parker’s Chilling Conclusions by Julia Lee.
  14. There Was A Country: A Personal History Of Biafra by Chinua Achebe.
  15. Star Wars The Last Jedi: Cobalt Squadron by Elizabeth Wein.
  16. Summary Justice by John Fairfax.
  17. A Spoonful Of Murder by Robin Stevens.
  18. Hackerspaces: Making The Maker Movement by Sarah R. Davies.
  19. Landscape With Invisible Hand by M. T. Anderson.
  20. Can The Euro Be Saved? by Malcolm Sawyer.
  21. London Rules by Mick Herron.
  22. The M&A Formula by Peter Zink Secher and Ian Horley.
  23. Rose Raventhorpe Investigates: Hounds And Hauntings by Janine Beacham.
  24. The Art of Doing Business Across Cultures by Craig Storti.
  25. The Playstation Dreamworld by Alfie Bown.
  26. The Hamilton Affair by Elizabeth Cobbs.
  27. What You Don’t Know by Joann Chaney.
  28. Amelia Fang And The Unicorn Lords by Laura Ellen Anderson.
  29. Horace & Harriet Take On The Town by Clare Elsom.
  30. Do We Need Economic Inequality? by Danny Dorling.
  31. Basic Income And How We Can Make It Happen by Guy Standing.
  32. What Everyone Needs To Know About Tax by James Hannam.
  33. Scythe by Neal Shusterman.
  34. Society Of Fear by Heinz Bude.
  35. The Ascendancy Of Finance by Joseph Vogl.
  36. Flying Tips For Flightless Birds by Kelly McCaughrain.
  37. Ghost Boys by Jewell Parker Rhodes.
  38. Did You See Melody? by Sophie Hannah.
  39. The Echo Killing by Christi Daugherty.
  40. The Confession by Jo Spain.
  41. Zenith by Sasha Alsberg and Lindsay Cummings.
  42. The Whitby Witches by Robin Jarvis.
  43. Syriza In Power by Costas Douzinas.
  44. The Exact Opposite Of Okay by Laura Steven.
  45. Refuge: Transforming A Broken Refugee System by Alexander Betts and Paul Collier.
  46. This Book Will (Help You) Change The World by Sue Turton.
  47. White Rabbit Red Wolf by Tom Pollock.
  48. Rory Branagan: Detective by Andrew Clover and Ralph Lazar.
  49. Purple Hearts by Michael Grant.
  50. The Wonder Of Us by Kim Culbertson.
  51. Can We Solve The Migration Crisis? by Jacqueline Bhabha.
  52. The Colour Of The Sun by David Almond.
  53. The Gender Games by Juno Dawson.
  54. Not If I Save You First by Ally Carter.
  55. The New Scramble For Africa by Pádraig Carmody.
  56. Little Miss Lucky Is Getting Married by Roger Hargreaves, Sarah Daykin, Lizzie Daykin and Liz Bankes.
  57. Small Money, Big Impact: Fighting Poverty With Microfinance by Peter Fanconi and Patrick Scheurle.
  58. Speak No Evil by Uzodinma Iweala.
  59. Star Of The North by D. B. John.
  60. To The Edge Of The World by Julia Green.
  61. The List by Mick Herron.
  62. One Clear Ice-Cold January Morning At The Beginning Of The Twenty-First Century by Roland Schimmerlpfennig.
  63. A New Politics From The Left by Hilary Wainwright.
  64. The Golden Child by Wendy James.
  65. Natboff! One Million Years Of Stupidity by Andy Stanton.
  66. Come And Find Me by Sarah Hilary.
  67. Directorate S: The CIA And America’s Secret Wars In Afghanistan And Pakistan, 2001 – 2016 by Steve Coll.
  68. Night Of The Party by Tracey Mathias.
  69. The Woman In The Mirror by Rebecca James.
  70. The Power Of Yes by Abbie Headon.
  71. The Case For A Maximum Wage by Sam Pizzigati.
  72. This Is What Happened by Mick Herron.
  73. Will Big Business Destroy Our Planet? by Peter Dauvergne.
  74. The Joneses & The Pirateers: Search For The Phantom Lady by S. L. Westgate.
  75. Lean Six Sigma For Leaders by Martin Brenig-Jones and Jo Dowdall.
  76. Run, Riot by Nikesh Shukla.

Run, Riot by Nikesh Shukla

The Blurb On The Back:

Community.  In the end, you’ll always want to help one of your own.

Taran and her twin brother Hari never wanted to move to Firestone House.  But when the rent was doubled overnight and Dad’s chemo meant he couldn’t work, they had to make this tower block their home.  It’s good now though; they feel part of something here.

When they start noticing boarded-up flats and glossy fliers for expensive apartments, they don’t think much of it – until Hari is caught up in a tragedy, and they are forced to go on the run.

It’s up to these teenagers to uncover the sinister truth behind what’s going on in the block, before it blows their world apart.

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

Read More »

Lean Six Sigma For Leaders by Martin Brenig-Jones and Jo Dowdall

The Blurb On The Back:

Outstanding quality control and continuous improvement shouldn’t be complicated and burdensome.  Now, you can quickly understand and practice the next-level solution to operations management with Lean Six Sigma For Leaders.

Written by industry influencers with a long, brilliant record of producing high-performing teams, this practical manual opens up the world of Lean Six Sigma in a way senior management can immediately use to create the optimal environment for improving operations every day.

A diverse collection of illuminating case studies reveal how organisations in several industries succeeded or failed using the Lean Six Sigma approach.  First-hand insights from the managers leading the initiative offer valuable advise on what they learned and might do differently next time.

Start your new path to ever-increasing levels of excellence with Lean Six Sigma For Leaders

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

Read More »

The Joneses & The Pirateers: Search For The Phantom Lady by S. L. Westgate

The Blurb On The Back:

Nine-year-old James and his sisters come from a family with a proud history of never having done anything exciting or adventurous, much to James’s annoyance.

He longs for adventure but gets more than he bargained for when a ruthless pirate captures his father.  James, Elizabeth and Emily find themselves stranded on the enchanted island of Tortuga – where the children of pirates live while their parents are off roaming the high seas.

The siblings must band together with a motley crew of orphan pirates-in-training to plan a dangerous rescue mission that takes them from shark-infested waters to explosive ocean battles to the brink of Davy Jones’s Locker … not to mention a sneaky search for the most legendary pirate treasure of all time.

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

Read More »

Will Big Business Destroy Our Planet? by Peter Dauvergne

The Blurb On The Back:

Walmart, Coca-Cola, BP, Toyota.  The world economy runs on the profits of transnational corporations.  Politicians need their backing.  Non-profit organizations rely on their philanthropy.  People look to their brands for meaning.  And their power continues to rise.

Can these companies, as so many are now hoping, provide the solutions to end the mounting global environmental crisis? Absolutely, the CEOs of big business are telling us: the commitment to corporate social responsibility will ensure it happens voluntarily.

Peter Dauvergne challenges this claim, arguing instead that corporations are still doing far more to destroy than protect our planet.  Trusting big business to lead sustainability is, he cautions, unwise – perhaps even catastrophic.  Planetary sustainability will require reining in the power of big business, starting now. 

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

Read More »

This Is What Happened by Mick Herron

The Blurb On The Back:

Something’s happened.

A lot of things have happened.

If there was a way of rolling back time, she wondered how far she would go.

Twenty-six-year-old Maggie Barnes is someone you would never look at twice.  Living alone in a month-to-month sublet in London, with no family except an estranged sister, no boyfriend or partner, and not much in the way of friends, Maggie is just the king of person who could vanish from the face of the earth without anyone taking notice.

Or just the kind of person MI5 needs to thwart an international plot that puts the whole of Britain at risk.

Now one young woman has the chance to be a hero – if she can think quickly enough to stay alive. 

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

Read More »

The Case For A Maximum Wage by Sam Pizzigati

The Blurb On The Back:

Modern societies set limits, on everything from how fast motorists can drive to how much waste factory owners can dump in our rivers. But incomes in our deeply unequal world have no limits. Could capping top incomes tackle rising inequality more effectively than conventional approaches?

In this engaging book, leading analyst Sam Pizzigati details how egalitarians worldwide are demonstrating that a “maximum wage” could be both economically viable and politically practical. He shows how, building on local initiatives, governments could use their tax systems to enforce fair income ratios across the board.

The ultimate goal? That ought to be, Pizzigati argues, a world without a super rich. He explains why we need to create that world – and how we could speed its creation. 

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

Read More »

The Power Of Yes by Abbie Headon

The Blurb On The Back:

Discover the power of YES and all the amazing things it can do for you.

So often we are afraid of failure, of disappointment, of being vulnerable, and we settle for ‘no’.  The practical tips and inspirational advice within these pages will help you embrace positivity and find a new sense of freedom in each area of your life, from your career, to your relationships, to your dreams and ambitions. 

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

Read More »

The Woman In The Mirror by Rebecca James

The Blurb On The Back:

1947

Governess Alice Miller loves Winterbourne the moment she sees it towering over the wild Cornish cliffs.  The house promises refuge from her past – and her charges, motherless twins Constance and Edmund, are angelic.

2018

Adopted at birth, Rachel’s roots are a mystery. So, when a letter brings news of the death of an unknown relative, Rachel travels to Cornwall, vowing to uncover her family’s secrets.

With each new arrival, something in Winterbourne stirs.  It’s hiding in the paintings.  It’s sitting on the stairs.  It’s waiting in a mirror, behind a locked door … 

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

Read More »

Night Of The Party by Tracey Mathias

The Blurb On The Back:

How do you speak out if you have no rights?

After withdrawing from the EU, Britain is governed by The Party, and everyone born outside the country is subject to immediate arrest and deportation.  Failing to report illegals is a crime.

Zara is the only one who knows how her friend Sophie died.  But Zara’s an illegal.

She can’t tell anyone her secrets.  Not even Ash, the boy she loves.  The boy who needs to know the truth.

As the country prepared for an election, Zara must take an impossible choice. 

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

Read More »

Directorate S: The CIA And America’s Secret Wars In Afghanistan And Pakistan, 2001 – 2016 by Steve Coll

The Blurb On The Back:

In the wake of the terrible shock of 9/11, the CIA scrambled to work out how to destroy Bin Laden and his associated. The CIA had long familiarity with Afghanistan and had worked closely with the Taliban to defeat the Soviet Union there. Superficially the invasion was quick and efficient, but Bin Laden’s successful escape, together with that of much of the Taliban leadership, and a catastrophic failure to define the limits of NATO’s mission in a tough, impoverished country the size of Texas, created a quagmire, which has now lasted many years.

At the heart of the problem lay ‘Directorate S’, a highly secretive arm of the Pakistan state, which had been covertly arming and training the Taliban for years as part of a wider competition for global influence, and which assumed that the USA and its allies would soon be leaving.

This remarkable new book tells a powerful, bitter story of just how badly foreign policy decisions can go wrong. 

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

Read More »