Master List of Books Read in 2019

  1. White Girls by Hilton Als.
  2. Still Lives by Maria Hummel.
  3. The Dark Days Deceit by Alison Goodman.
  4. Mass Starvation: The History And Future Of Famine by Alex de Waal.
  5. Girl In The Window by Penny Joelson.
  6. War Is Over by David Almond and David Litchfield.
  7. The Magic Misfits 2: The Second Story by Neil Patrick Harris.
  8. The Empowered Manager by Peter Block.
  9. Grist Mill Road by Christopher J Yates.
  10. The Free-Time Formula by Jeff Sanders.
  11. Egypt by Robert Springborg.
  12. Amelia Fang And The Memory Thief by Laura Ellen Anderson.
  13. The Spy Who Came In From The Cold by John Le Carré.
  14. A Very Large Expanse Of Sea by Tahereh Mafi.
  15. Joe Quinn’s Poltergeist by David Almond and Dave McKean.
  16. The Accidental President by Tom McLaughlin.
  17. Heimat: A German Family Album by Nora Krug.
  18. The Happiness Fantasy by Carl Cederström.
  19. Under The Ice by Rachael Blok.
  20. A Legacy Of Spies by John Le Carré.
  21. Planet Omar: Accidental Trouble Magnet by Zanib Mian.
  22. In Blossom by Yooju Cheon.
  23. Love From Dr Seuss.
  24. Swiss Watching: Inside The Land Of Milk And Honey by Diccon Bewes.
  25. A Story About Cancer (With A Happy Ending) by India Desjardins and Marianne Ferrer.
  26. The La’lun by J N Harris.
  27. Future Politics by Jamie Susskind.
  28. You Can’t Hide by Sarah Mussi.
  29. Unsolved Murders: True Crime Cases Uncovered by Amber Hunt and Emily G. Thompson.
  30. Winners Take All by Anand Giridharadas.

Winners Take All by Anand Giridharadas

The Blurb On The Back:

What explains the spreading backlash against the global elite?  In this revelatory investigation Anand Giridharadas takes us into the inner sanctums of a new gilded age, showing how the elite follow a ‘win-win’ logic, fighting for equality and justice any way they can – except ways that threaten their position at the top.

But why should our gravest problems be solved by consultancies, technology companies and corporate-sponsored charities instead of public institutions and elected officials?  Why should we rely on scraps from the winners?  Trenchant and gripping, this is an indispensable guide and call to action for elites and citizens alike. 

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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Unsolved Murders: True Crime Cases Uncovered by Amber Hunt and Emily G. Thompson

The Blurb On The Back:

Discover the stories behind 20 of the most infamous unsolved murders of the last century, including the Black Dahlia, the Zodiac Killer and the JonBenét Ramsey case.

Crime scenes, crucial witnesses and persons of interest are clearly and concisely presented, along with essential details and clues.

Examine the evidence and decide for yourself who could have done it?

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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You Can’t Hide by Sarah Mussi

The Blurb On The Back:

Lexi has been in an accident.

But she can’t remember it – or any of the events leading up to it.

The only thing she knows for sure is that she’s still in danger.

As fragments of her past start to return, Lexi thinks she knows what happened.

But can Lexi trust her own memories?  Because if she’s wrong … she’s in more danger now than ever before.

Exactly what happened on that spring evening down by the railway tracks?

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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Future Politics by Jamie Susskind

The Blurb On The Back:

Politics in the twentieth century was dominated by a single question:

how much of our collective life should be determined by the state, and what should be left to the market and civil society?

Now the debate is different:

to what extent should our lives be directed and controlled by powerful digital systems – and on what terms?

Digital technologies – from artificial intelligence to blockchain, from robotics to virtual reality – are transforming the way we live together.  Those who control the most powerful technologies are increasingly able to control the rest of us.  As time goes on, these powerful entities – usually big tech firms and the state – will set the limit of our liberty, decreeing what may be done and what is forbidden.  Their algorithms will determine vital questions of social justice.  In their hands, democracy will flourish or decay.

A landmark work of political theory, Future Politics challenges readers to rethink what it means to be free or equal, what it means to have power or property, and what it means for a political system to be just or democratic.  In a time of rapid and relentless changes, it is a book about how we can – and must – regain control. 

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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The La’lun by J N Harris

The Blurb On The Back:

Every family has a secret – this one is the last of its kind.

When Camille discovers the secret her grandmother has protected for decades, she knows that to tell anyone would be to tell everyone – with terrible consequences.

But it could also bring the rest of her family back into her life. 

This is a story about love and loyalty, truth and lies.  Real news, fake news and how far you’d go to protect what you love.

It’s a story for now with its roots in ancient folklore. 

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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A Story About Cancer (With A Happy Ending) by India Desjardins and Marianne Ferrer

The Blurb On The Back:

”I think about everything I’ll miss if they tell me I’m going to die … my mum, my dad, my sister, cookies, TV shows I’ll never get to see the end of, the starry sky on a full moon, my grandparents, my grandpa’s lasagne, kissing Victor, Victor’s eyes, Victor’s voice, Victor’s smell, Victor’s hands … Victor.”

This is a story about cancer with a happy ending. It’s about life, love and, especially, hope.

For the past few years, a teenage girl has endured many hospital treatments, wearing a bandanna, people giving her ‘that look’, and her dad’s embarrassing jokes with the nurses.  But she’s also fallen in love.

Now she’s on her way to the hospital, where they’re going to tell her how much time she’s got to live.

A few years ago, author India Desjardins met a young girl with leukaemia who asked her to write a story about cancer with a happy ending.  This is that story. 

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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Swiss Watching: Inside The Land Of Milk And Honey by Diccon Bewes

The Blurb On The Back:

One country, four languages, 26 cantons and 8 million people (but only 75% of them Swiss): welcome to Europe’s most individual country.  But there’s more to Switzerland than banks and skis, francs and cheese.  This is a place where the breathtaking scenery shaped a nation not just a tour itinerary, and where tradition is as important as innovation.  It’s also been home to travel writer Diccon Bewes for over a decade.

Diccon started his Swiss explorations by seeking Heidi and finding the best chocolate, but soon became the ultimate outsider on the inside.  He discovered that not all the cheese has holes, cuckoo clocks aren’t Swiss and the trains aren’t always on time.  In fact, he uncovered the true meaning of Swissness and, in this new edition, started on the road to becoming Swiss himself.  

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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Planet Omar: Accidental Trouble Magnet by Zanib Mian

The Blurb On The Back:

My name is Omar.

I have a huge imagination.

I hate marshmallows.

And this is the first book all abut me!

You might not know me yet, but once you open the pages of this book you’ll laugh so hard that snot will come out of your nose (plus you might meet a dragon and a zombie – what more could you want?).

My parents decided it would be a good idea to move house and move me to a new school at the same time.  As if I didn’t have a hard enough time staying out of trouble at home, now I’ve also got to try and make new friends.  What’s worse, the class bully seems to think I’m the perfect target.

At least Eid’s around the corner which means a feast (yay) and presents (double yay).  Well, as long as I can stay in mum and dad’s good books long enough … 

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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