Master List of Books Read in 2018

  1. How To Hang A Witch by Adriana Mather.
  2. In Pursuit Of Memory: The Fight Against Alzheimer’s by Joseph Jebelli.
  3. The Cruel Prince by Holly Black.
  4. Satellite by Nick Lake.
  5. The City Of Brass by S. A. Chakraborty.
  6. East Of Hounslow by Khurrum Rahman.
  7. The Woman In The Window by A. J. Finn.
  8. Seventeen by Hideo Yokoyama.
  9. Now We Are Dead by Stuart MacBride.
  10. Why Democracies Need Science by Harry Collins & Robert Evans.
  11. Bioinformation by Bronwyn Parry and Beth Greenhough.
  12. Blackbird by N. D. Gomes.
  13. Nancy Parker’s Chilling Conclusions by Julia Lee.
  14. There Was A Country: A Personal History Of Biafra by Chinua Achebe.
  15. Star Wars The Last Jedi: Cobalt Squadron by Elizabeth Wein.
  16. Summary Justice by John Fairfax.
  17. A Spoonful Of Murder by Robin Stevens.
  18. Hackerspaces: Making The Maker Movement by Sarah R. Davies.
  19. Landscape With Invisible Hand by M. T. Anderson.

Landscape With Invisible Hand by M. T. Anderson

The Blurb On The Back:

We were all surprised when the vuvv landed the first time.  We were just glad they weren’t invading.  We couldn’t believe our luck when they offered us their tech and invited us to be part of their Interspecies Co-Prosperity Alliance. 

Several years on, jobs are scarce due to the rise of alien tech and there’s no money for food, clean water, or the vuvv’s miraculous medicine.  Adam and his girlfriend, Chloe, must get creative to survive.  Since the vuvv crave “classic” Earth culture, recording 1950s-style dates for them to view seems like a brilliant idea.

But it’s hard for Adam and Chloe to murmur sweet nothings when they hate each other more with every episode.  Soon enough, Adam must decide how far he’s willing to go – and what he’s willing to sacrifice. 

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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Hackerspaces: Making The Maker Movement by Sarah R. Davies

The Blurb On The Back:

A new industrial revolution.  The age of making.  From bits to atoms.  Many people are excited by the possibilities offered by new fabrication technologies like 3D printers, and the ways in which they are being used in hacker and makerspaces.  But why is the power of hacking and making an idea whose time has come?

Hackerspaces: Making The Maker Movement takes the rise of the maker movement as its starting point.  Hacker and makerspaces, Fab Labs, and DIY bio spaces are emerging all over the world.  Based on a study of hacker and makerspaces across the US, this book explores cultures of hacking and making in the context of wider social changes, arguing that excitement about the maker movement is not just about the availability of new technologies, but the kind of citizens we are expected to be. 

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A Spoonful Of Murder by Robin Stevens

The Blurb On The Back:

”A terrible thing has happened, a thing that the Detective Society must investigate.  But this time I am not just a detective, I’m a witness.  And I think that I might even be a suspect …”

When Hazel Wong’s beloved grandfather passes away, Daisy Wells joins Hazel on a visit to her family’s estate in beautiful, bustling Hong Kong.

But they are greeted with a shock: there’s a new member of the Wong family!  As if that isn’t enough, tragedy soon strikes not once but twice.  There’s been a murder and a kidnap and no one is safe from suspicion … not even Hazel.

The girls must work together like never before, confronting dangerous gangs and sinister private detectives to solve the crimes and discover the villain – before it’s too late.

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Summary Justice by John Fairfax

The Blurb On The Back:

The last time Tess de Vere saw William Benson she was a law student on work experience.  He was a twenty-one-year-old, led from the dock of the Old Bailey to begin a life sentence for murder.  He’d said he was innocent.  She’s believed him.

Sixteen years later, Tess overhears a couple of hacks mocking a newcomer to the London Bar, a no-hoper with a murder conviction, running his own show from an old fishmonger’s in Spitalfields.  That night she walks back into Benson’s life.  The price of his rehabilitation – and access to the Bar – is an admission of guilt to the killing of Paul Harebeton, whose family have vowed revenge.  He’s an outcast.  The government wants to shut him down and no solicitor will instruct him.  But he’s subsidised by a mysterious benefactor ad a desperate woman has turned to him for help: Sarah Collingstone, mother of a child with special needs, accused of slaying her wealthy lover.  It’s a hopeless case and the murder trial, Benson’s first, starts in four days.  The evidence is overwhelming but, like Benson long ago, she swears she’s innocent.  Tess joins the defence team, determined to help Benson survive.  But as Benson follows the twists and turns in the courtroom, Tess embarks upon a secret investigation of her own, determined to uncover the truth behind the death of Paul Harebeton on a lonely night in Soho.  

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