Cast Iron by Peter May

The Blurb On The Back:

In 1989, a killer dumped the body of twenty-year-old Lucie Martin into a picturesque lake in the West of France.  Fourteen years later, a summer heat wave parched the earth exposing her remains amid the scorched mud and slime.

The killer was never found.  But now, forensic expert Enzo Macleod is reviewing the stone cold case – the toughest of those he has been challenged to crack.

When Enzo spots a flaw in the original investigation, he expects positive developments.  Yet he is in fact prising open a Pandora’s box – one very much designed to be kept closed – to the peril of himself, and everyone he loves.   

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

Read More »

The Last Act Of Hattie Hoffman by Mindy Mejia

The Blurb On The Back:

The first and most important lesson in acting is to read your audience.  Know what they want you to be and give it to them.

Hattie Hoffman knows the power of acting.  Become whatever people want you to be and they will love you; and when they love you, the power is in your hands.

When Hattie is stabbed to death on the opening night of her high school play, the only suspect is a Shakespearean curse.  Sheriff Del Goodman looked on Hattie as a daughter.  He vows to hunt down her killer, but discovers instead the full extent of Hattie’s acting talents.  She held their small town in her thrall, but as more of her secrets are revealed, and mask after mask is discarded, he realises the girl he knew was far from the true Hattie Hoffman.

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

Read More »

Truevine by Beth Macy

The Blurb On The Back:

Two brothers, a kidnapping and a mother’s quest: a true story of the American south.

The year was 1899, as the old people told the story; the place a sweltering tobacco farm in Truevine, Virginia, the heart of the Jim Crow South, where everyone the Muse brothers knew was either a former slave, or a child or grandchild of slaves.

George and Willie Muse were just six and nine years’ old, but they worked the fields from dawn to dark.  Until a white man offered them candy, and stole them away to become circus freaks.  For the next twenty-eight years, their distraught mother struggled to get them back.

But were they really kidnapped?  And how did their mother, a barely literate black woman in the segregated South, manage to bring them home?  And why, after coming home, did they want to go back to the circus?

At the height of their fame, the Muse brothers performed for royalty at Buckingham Palace and headlined over a dozen sold-out shows at New York’s Madison Square Garden.  They were global superstars in a pre-broadcast era.  But the very root of their success was in the colour of their skin and in the outrageous caricatures they were forced to assume: supposed cannibals, sheep-headed freaks, even ‘Ambassadors from Mars’.

The result of hundreds of interviews and decades of research, Truevine tells the extraordinary story of what really happened to the Muse brothers for the first time.  It is an unforgettable tale of cruelty and exploitation, but also of loyalty, determination and love. 

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

Read More »

They Can’t Kill Us All: The Story Of Black Lives Matter by Wesley Lowery

The Blurb On The Back:

This is the story of the birth of a movement, from the award-winning journalist who reported at the heart of it.  Based on over a year of on-the-ground reporting, it is an unprecedented portrait of the reality of police violence and endemic racism in America, and those trying to combat it. 

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

Read More »