The Glorious Heresies by Lisa McInerney

The Blurb On The Back:

Maureen didn’t mean to kill a man, but what can a poor dear do when she’s surprised by an intruder and has only a holy stone to hand?  Lucky that she’s just reconnected with her estranged son Jimmy because, as the most feared gangster in Cork, he certainly has the tools to sort out the mess.

So Jimmy enlists his boyhood buddy Tony who, with six kids and a love of the bottle, could certainly do with the money, even if his teenage son, Ryan, is far too keen to grow up so he can become a gangster himself.  And all is going to plan until Georgie, the girlfriend of the hapless intruder, starts to wonder where he went …

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The Break Down by B. A. Paris

The Blurb On The Back:

It all started that night in the woods.

Cass Anderson didn’t stop to help the woman in the car, and now she’s dead.

Ever since, silent calls have been plaguing Cass and she’s sure someone is watching her.

Consumed by guilt, she’s also started to forget things.  Whether she took her pills, what her house alarm code is, and if the knife in the kitchen really had blood on it.

If you can’t trust yourself, who can you trust?

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From Darkest Skies by Sam Peters

The Blurb On The Back:

Five years after the murder of his wife and fellow agent Alysha, Keona Rause returns to the distant world of Magenta to resume work with the Intelligence Service.

With him he brings an illegal artificial recreation of his wife, an AI built from every digital trace she left behind.

She has been constructed with one purpose – to discover the truth behind her own death – but Keona’s relationship with her has grown into something more.

Something that verges on love.

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Symphony For The City Of The Dead: Dmitri Shostakovich and the Siege of Leningrad by M. T. Anderson

The Blurb On The Back:

In September of 1941, Adolf Hitler’s Wehrmacht surrounded Leningrad in what was to become one of the longest and most destructive sieges in Western history – two and a half years of bombardment and starvation.  More than a million citizens perished.  Survivors recall corpses littering the frozen streets, the relatives of the dead having neither the means nor the strength to bury them.  Desperate citizens burned books, furniture, and floorboards to keep warm; they ate family pets and – eventually – even one another to stay alive.

Trapped between the Nazi invading force and the Soviet government itself was composer Dmitri Shostakovich, who would write a symphony that roused, rallied, eulogised, and commemorated his fellow citizens – the Leningrad Symphony.  This testament of courage was copied onto microfilm, driven across the Middle East, and flown over the deserts of North Africa to be performed in the United States – where it played a surprising role in strengthening the Grand Alliance against the Axis powers. 

This is the true story of a city under siege: the triumph of bravery and defiance in the face of terrifying odds.  It is also a look at the power – and layered meaning – of music in beleaguered lives. 

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The Watcher by Ross Armstrong

The Blurb On The Back:

She’s watching you.

Lily Gullick lives in a new-build flat opposite a London estate marked for demolition.  A keen birdwatcher since childhood, she can’t resist turning her binoculars on her neighbours.  Observing their daily routines and making up stories about their lives.

But one day she sees something suspicious and shortly afterwards the body of a woman is discovered.

Lily realises that she might have information about the dead woman and knows that she has to act but her interference does not go unnoticed.  And soon her own life comes under threat.

But who’s watching her?

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Why Wall Street Matters by William D. Cohan

The Blurb On The Back:

”This is my effort to pry open the black box that Wall Street has carefully constructed around itself in the last generation, much to its detriment.  It’s a black box that makes it almost impossible for the average American to understand what goes on there, why it is important to nearly everything we hold dear, and why we wouldn’t much like to live in a world without Wall Street.”

If you like your smartphone or your widescreen TV, your car or your pension, then, whether you know it or not, you are a fan of Wall Street.

William D. Cohan, bestselling author of House of Cards, has long been critical of the bad behaviour that plagued much of Wall Street in the years leading up to the 2008 financial crisis, and, as an ex-banker, he is an expert on its inner workings as well.  But in recent years he has become alarmed by the vitriol directed at the bankers, traders and executives who keep the wheels of our economy turning.  Why Wall Street Matters is a timely and trenchant reminder of the actual good these institutions do and the dire consequences for us all if the essential role they play in making our lives better is carelessly curtailed.

In a brisk, non-nonsense narrative, Cohan traces the history of Wall Street from a handful of traders on a cobblestone street in downtown Manhattan to the global financial behemoth it is today.  Along the way, he argues that Wall Street and the big banks, with their important interstitial role between those who have capital and those who need it, are the invisible, albeit flawed, engines that power our ideas.  Instead of denigrated, they should be celebrated and made to work better for us.

Maybe you think the banks should be broken up and the bankers held accountable for what happened in 2008.  Maybe you hate the greed of Wall Street but know that it’s important to the world economy.  Maybe you don’t really understand Wall Street, and phrases such as credit default swap make your eyes glaze over.  Maybe you think President Trump is America’s saviour or believe that he will destroy everything.

Whoever you are, whatever you think, the blunt, brief and utterly accessible Why Wall Street Matters will be your beacon through the fog.

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Cream Buns And Crime by Robin Stevens

The Blurb On The Back:

Daisy and Hazel invite you to discover their untold stories …

Daisy Wells and Hazel Wong are famous for solving murder mysteries.  But there are many other intrigues in the pages of Hazel’s casebook, from the spooky Case of the Deepdean Vampire, to the baffling Case of the Blue Violet, and their very first whodunit: The Case of Lavinia’s Missing Tie.

This collection is packed with brilliant mini-mysteries, including stories about rival detectives, the Junior Pinkertons, and honorary Detective Society members, Beanie and Kitty.  Peppered with puzzles, facts and tips on detecting, this is the perfect book for budding sleuths and fans of the award-winning, bestselling Murder Most Unladylike series.  

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The Fix by Liam Vaughan and Gavin Finch

The Blurb On The Back:

”The first thing you think is, where’s the edge?  Where can I make a bit more money?  You want every little bit of money that you can possibly get because, like I say, that is how you are judged: that is your performance metric.”

– Tom Hayes, convicted former trader for UBS and Citigroup

The Fix, by award-winning Bloomberg journalists Liam Vaughan and Gavin Finch, is the inside story of the Libor scandal told through the journey of the man at the center of it – Tom Hayes, a young, scruffy, socially awkward misfit from England whose genius for math and obsessive personality made him a trading phenomenon but ultimately paved the way for his own downfall.   

In the midst of the financial crisis, Hayes and his network of traders and brokers from Wall Street’s leading firms engineered the biggest financial conspiracy ever seen.  As the rest of the world burned, they came together on secret chat rooms and late-night phone calls to hatch an audacious plan to rig Libor.  Without the persistence of a rag-tag team of investigators from the US, they would have gotten away with it …

Based on hundreds of interviews opening up unprecedented access to the traders and brokers involved in the scandal, the regulators and central bankers who failed to stop it and the investigators who caught up with them, The Fix provides a rare look into the dark heart of global finance at the start of the 21st century.

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A Handful Of Ashes by Rob McCarthy

The Blurb On The Back:

Susan Bayliss became notorious when she blew the whistle on her boss, a heart surgeon at a renowned children’s hospital.  She accuse him of negligence, operations were stopped and an inquiry launched.  In the end she was the one suspended as a troublemaker.

Now Dr Harry Kent, a medical examiner with the Met Police, has been called out to certify her suicide.

But something about the scene is wrong.  Someone held Susan down.

The grieving parents of the children who died demand answers.  The hospital is stonewalling.  Everyone has secrets – it’s up to Harry and DCI Frankie Noble to find out which were worth killing for. 

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