The Waking Land by Callie Bates

The Blurb On The Back:

Magic.  Romance.  Revolution. 

It’s been fourteen years, since King Antoine took Elanna hostage.  Fourteen years since her father’s rebellion failed.  Fourteen years spent being raised by the man who condemned her people to misery.

Now twenty, Elanna is about to be taken prisoner once again … but this time by her father.

He wants to reignite his rebellion, this time using Elanna as a figurehead.  He will tell his followers she is the legendary Wildegarde reborn, a sorceress who could make the very earth tremble.

But what no one knows is that magic really does flow through Elanna’s veins.  Now she must decide which side she’s on, and whether she’ll use her powers for mercy … or revenge.  

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Will China’s Economy Collapse? by Ann Lee

The Blurb On The Back:

The recent downturn in the Chinese economy has become a focal point of global attention, with some analysts warning that China is edging dangerously close to economic meltdown.  Is it possible that the second largest economy in the world could collapse and drag the rest of the world with it?

In this penetrating essay, Ann Lee explains both why China’s economy will not sink us all and the policy options on which it is drawing to mitigate against such a catastrophic scenario.  Dissecting with realistic clarity the challenges facing the Chinese economy, she makes a compelling case for its continued robustness in multiple sectors in the years ahead. 

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Will Robots Take Your Job? by Nigel M. de S. Cameron

The Blurb On The Back:

The trend that began with ATMs and do-it-yourself checkouts is moving at lightning speed.  Everything from driving to teaching to the care of the elderly and, indeed, code-writing can now be done by smart machines.  Conventional wisdom says there will be new jobs to replace those we lose – but is it so simple?  And are we ready?

Technology writer and think-tank director Nigel Cameron argues it’s naïve to believe we face a smooth transition.  Whether or not there are “new” jobs, we face massive disruption as the jobs millions of us are doing gets outsourced to machines.  A twenty-first century “rust belt” will rapidly corrode the labour market and affect literally hundreds of different kinds of jobs simultaneously.

Robots won’t design our future – we will.  Yet, shockingly, political leaders and policymakers don’t seem to have this in their line of sight.  So how should we assess and prepare for the risks of this unknown future?

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Can The Internet Strengthen Democracy? by Stephen Coleman

The Blurb On The Back:

From its inception as a public communication network, the Internet was regarded by many people as a potential means of escaping from the stranglehold of top-down, stage-managed politics.  If hundreds of millions of people could be the producers as well as the receivers of political messages, could that invigorate democracy?  If political elites fail to respond to such energy, where will it leave them?

In this book, renowned scholar of political communication Stephen Coleman argues that the best way to strengthen democracy is to reinvent it for the twenty-first century.  Governments and global institutions have failed to seize the opportunity to democratize their ways of operating, but online citizens are ahead of them, developing practices that could revolutionize the exercise of political power. 

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Your Life In My Hands: A Junior Doctor’s Story by Rachel Clarke

The Blurb On The Back:

”I am a junior doctor.  It is 4 a.m.  I have run arrest calls, treated life-threatening bleeding, held the hand of a young woman dying of cancer, scuttled down miles of dim corridors wanting to sob with sheer exhaustion, forgotten to eat, forgotten to drink, drawn on every fibre of strength that I possess to keep my patients safe from harm.”

Rachel Clarke’s incredible memoir follows her journey as a junior doctor, offering a glimpse into a life spent between the dissection room and the mortuary, the bedside and the doctors’ mess, exposing stark realities about today’s NHS and what it means to be entrusted with carrying another’s life in your hands.

Rachel was at the forefront of the historic junior doctor strikes in 2016, campaigning against the government and arguing across the press that imposing a contract on young doctors would irrevocably damage the NHS.

This book affects us all.

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The Marsh King’s Daughter by Karen Dionne

The Blurb On The Back:

”I was born two years into my mother’s captivity.  She was three weeks shy of seventeen.  If I had known then what I do now, things would have been a lot different.  I would have been a lot more understanding of my mother.  I wouldn’t have adored my father.”

When the notorious child abductor known as the Marsh King escapes from a maximum security prison, Helena immediately suspects that she and her two young daughters are in danger.

No one, not even her husband, knows the truth about Helena’s past: they don’t know that she was born into captivity, that she had no contact with the outside world before the age of twelve – or that her father raised her to be a killer.

And they don’t know that the Marsh King can survive and hunt in the wilderness better than anyone … except, perhaps his own daughter. 

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The Force by Don Winslow

The Blurb On The Back:

Good cop or bad cop? We’re all corrupt …

Everyone can be bought. At the right price …

Detective sergeant Denny Malone leads an elite unit to fight gangs, drugs and guns in New York. For eighteen years he’s been on the front lines, doing whatever it takes to survive in a city built by ambition and corruption, where no one is clean.

What only a few know is that Denny Malone himself is dirty: he and his partners have stolen millions of dollars in drugs and cash. Now he’s caught in a trap and being squeezed by the Feds, and he must walk a thin line of betrayal, while the city teeters on the brink of a racial conflagration that could destroy them all. 

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The Stars Are Legion by Kameron Hurley

The Blurb On The Back:

Somewhere on the outer rim of the universe, a mass of decaying world-ships known as the Legion is travelling in the seams between the stars. Here in the darkness, a war for control of the Legion has been waged for generations, with no clear resolution.

As worlds continue to die, a desperate plan is put into motion.

Zan wakes with no memory, prisoner of a people who say they are her family. She is told she is their salvation – the only person capable of boarding the Makshi, a world-ship with the power to leave the Legion. But Zan’s new family is not the only one desperate to gain control of the prized ship. Zan finds that she must choose sides in a genocidal campaign that will take her from the edges of the Legion’s gravity well to the very belly of the world.

Zan will soon learn that she carries the seeds of the Legion’s destruction – and its possible salvation. But can she and the band of cast-off followers she has gathered survive the horrors of the Legion and its people long enough to deliver it?

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Silver Stars by Michael Grant

The Blurb On The Back:

I hear civilians saying we’re all heroes. 

Here’s one of the nasty little twists that come in war: if you don’t manage to get wounded or dead, they’ll promote you. Right when you start to get good at following, they want you to lead.

If everyone is a hero, then no one is.

No longer raw recruits, Rio, Frangie and Rainy have all faced combat and know that it has changed them. They may have fought on the front lines, but the personal battles rage on …

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101 Ways To Win An Election by Mark Pack and Edward Maxfield

The Blurb On The Back:

In politics there are no prizes for second place.

Packed with advice and practical examples, this guide reveals the insider secrets and skills you need to make sure you’re a winner on election day. In easily digestible bite-sized chapters, seasoned campaign professionals Mark Pack and Edward Maxfield share successful tactics from around the globe to help steer you on the course to power.

Learn to hate trees, always have more people than chairs and never, ever, forget the law of the left nostril – head those lessons and win that election.

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The Cutaway by Christina Kovac

The Blurb On The Back:

It begins with someone else’s story.  The story of a woman who leaves a busy restaurant on a chilly spring night in Washington, DC, walks out into the night and disappears completely.

Evelyn Carney is missing.  For brilliant TV news producer Virginia Knightly, that’s a story worth investigating.  But as she traces Evelyn’s last movements, she finds herself stumbling on secrets that powerful people want kept out of the news.  Soon, it’s clear that before she uncovers what really happened that night, she’ll need to fight for her career, her sanity –and even her life. 

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Before They Are Hanged by Joe Abercrombie

The Blurb On The Back:

How do you defend a city surrounded by enemies and riddled with traitors, when your allies can by no means be trusted, and your predecessor vanished without trace?  It’s enough to make a torturer want to run – if he could even walk without a stick – and Inquisitor Glotka needs answers before the Gurkish army comes knocking at the gates.

Northmen have spilled over the Angland border and are spreading fire and death across the frozen country.  Crown Prince Ladisla is poised to drive them back and win undying glory.  There is only one problem: he commands the worst armed, worst-trained and worst-led army in the world.

And Bayaz, the First of the Magi, is leading a party of bold adventurers on a mission through the ruins of the past.  The most hated woman in the South, the most feared man in the North, and most selfish boy in the Union make strange companions, but, if only they didn’t hate each other so much, potentially deadly ones.

Ancient secrets will be uncovered.  Bloody battles will be won and lost.  Bitter enemies will be forgiven – but not before they are hanged. 

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S.T.A.G.S. by M. A. Bennett

The Blurb On The Back:

Nine students.  Three blood sports.  One deadly weekend.

It is the autumn term and Greer MacDonald is struggling to settle into sixth form at the exclusive St Aidan the Great boarding school, known to its privileged pupils as STAGS.  Just when she thinks she’ll never make any friends, Greer receives a mysterious invitation with three words embossed upon it: huntin’ shootin’ fishin’.

When Greer learns that the invitation is to spend the half-term weekend at the country manor of Henry de Warlencourt, the most popular and wealthy boy at STAGS, she is as surprised as she is flattered.

But when she joins the chosen few at the ancient and sprawling Longcross Hall, it becomes apparent that Henry’s parents are not at home … and that the only adults present are a cohort of eerily compliant servants.  The students are at the mercy of their volatile host.

Over the next three days, as the three blood sports – hunting, shooting and fishing – become increasingly sadistic, Greer comes to a horrifying realisation … It’s not the wild game that Henry is hunting, but the very misfits he’s brought with him from school. 

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Playing With Death by Simon Scarrow and Lee Francis

The Blurb On The Back:

FBI Special Agent Rose Blake has faced evil and survived.

Haunted by a failed undercover mission, Rose is finding it hard to shake the memories of her close encounter with a ruthless serial killer – one who is still free, and could strike again without warning.

The call to investigate a suspected arson attack that’s left a man dead is a welcome distraction.  It’s not the kind of case usually assigned to the FBI, but nothing about this crime is usual.  As Rose digs deeper, she finds herself confronting the sort of imagination her son might see in the fantasy worlds of his video games.

But when your opponent is a killer, nothing feels like a game … 

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Blackwing by Ed McDonald

The Blurb On The Back:

The Misery is a wasteland: a dangerous, corrupted frontier between the Republic and The Deep Kings.

When traitors, thieves and spies try to flee they run for The Misery, and often as not it’s Captain Ryhalt Galharrow’s job to bring them to heel beneath the fractured skies – provided they haven’t already fallen prey to the twisted creatures that inhabit the shifting polluted sands.  It’s a deadly place, even for a man of Galharrow’s experience.

But it’s a necessary place.  Because the Republic’s only other defence against The Deep Kings is Nall’s Engine, a weapon of incomparable power that protects the wasteland’s border.  As long as it doesn’t start to falter … 

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Suffragettes And The Fight For The Vote by Sarah Ridley

The Blurb On The Back:

While the First World War still raged on, another battle was finally seeing some results.  In February 1918, British women over the age of 30 finally gained the right to vote in general elections.  The hard-won victory was the result of a long struggle.  This book takes up the story in the mid 19th century, when the first petition was presented to Parliament, and traces the fight for the vote through the work of suffrage organisations and the suffragettes.  From peaceful demonstrations to violent campaigns and prison hunger strikes, the story is brought to life through fascinating historical photos and artefacts.

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Before This Is Over by Amanda Hickie

The Blurb On The Back:

A normal family.  A quiet, leafy street.  A terrifying epidemic.

It’s been coming for a while: a lethal illness.  With sons of five and fourteen to look out for Hannah has been stockpiling supplies, despite everyone telling her that it’s unnecessary.

Then it arrives.

At first there are a few unconfirmed cases.  Then a death.  Now the whole city is quarantined.  But Hannah’s family is not yet safe behind their locked front door …

Basics soon become luxuries, and neighbours become hazards.  There are power cuts, food shortages and an ever-growing sense of claustrophobia.  How will the family cope?

How would you cope?

How far would you go to protect your children? 

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