Master List of Books Read in 2018

  1. How To Hang A Witch by Adriana Mather.
  2. In Pursuit Of Memory: The Fight Against Alzheimer’s by Joseph Jebelli.
  3. The Cruel Prince by Holly Black.
  4. Satellite by Nick Lake.
  5. The City Of Brass by S. A. Chakraborty.
  6. East Of Hounslow by Khurrum Rahman.
  7. The Woman In The Window by A. J. Finn.
  8. Seventeen by Hideo Yokoyama.
  9. Now We Are Dead by Stuart MacBride.
  10. Why Democracies Need Science by Harry Collins & Robert Evans.
  11. Bioinformation by Bronwyn Parry and Beth Greenhough.
  12. Blackbird by N. D. Gomes.
  13. Nancy Parker’s Chilling Conclusions by Julia Lee.
  14. There Was A Country: A Personal History Of Biafra by Chinua Achebe.
  15. Star Wars The Last Jedi: Cobalt Squadron by Elizabeth Wein.
  16. Summary Justice by John Fairfax.
  17. A Spoonful Of Murder by Robin Stevens.
  18. Hackerspaces: Making The Maker Movement by Sarah R. Davies.
  19. Landscape With Invisible Hand by M. T. Anderson.
  20. Can The Euro Be Saved? by Malcolm Sawyer.
  21. London Rules by Mick Herron.
  22. The M&A Formula by Peter Zink Secher and Ian Horley.
  23. Rose Raventhorpe Investigates: Hounds And Hauntings by Janine Beacham.
  24. The Art of Doing Business Across Cultures by Craig Storti.
  25. The Playstation Dreamworld by Alfie Bown.
  26. The Hamilton Affair by Elizabeth Cobbs.
  27. What You Don’t Know by Joann Chaney.
  28. Amelia Fang And The Unicorn Lords by Laura Ellen Anderson.
  29. Horace & Harriet Take On The Town by Clare Elsom.
  30. Do We Need Economic Inequality? by Danny Dorling.
  31. Basic Income And How We Can Make It Happen by Guy Standing.
  32. What Everyone Needs To Know About Tax by James Hannam.
  33. Scythe by Neal Shusterman.
  34. Society Of Fear by Heinz Bude.
  35. The Ascendancy Of Finance by Joseph Vogl.
  36. Flying Tips For Flightless Birds by Kelly McCaughrain.
  37. Ghost Boys by Jewell Parker Rhodes.
  38. Did You See Melody? by Sophie Hannah.
  39. The Echo Killing by Christi Daugherty.
  40. The Confession by Jo Spain.
  41. Zenith by Sasha Alsberg and Lindsay Cummings.
  42. The Whitby Witches by Robin Jarvis.
  43. Syriza In Power by Costas Douzinas.
  44. The Exact Opposite Of Okay by Laura Steven.
  45. Refuge: Transforming A Broken Refugee System by Alexander Betts and Paul Collier.
  46. This Book Will (Help You) Change The World by Sue Turton.
  47. White Rabbit Red Wolf by Tom Pollock.
  48. Rory Branagan: Detective by Andrew Clover and Ralph Lazar.
  49. Purple Hearts by Michael Grant.
  50. The Wonder Of Us by Kim Culbertson.
  51. Can We Solve The Migration Crisis? by Jacqueline Bhabha.
  52. The Colour Of The Sun by David Almond.
  53. The Gender Games by Juno Dawson.
  54. Not If I Save You First by Ally Carter.
  55. The New Scramble For Africa by Pádraig Carmody.
  56. Little Miss Lucky Is Getting Married by Roger Hargreaves, Sarah Daykin, Lizzie Daykin and Liz Bankes.
  57. Small Money, Big Impact: Fighting Poverty With Microfinance by Peter Fanconi and Patrick Scheurle.
  58. Speak No Evil by Uzodinma Iweala.
  59. Star Of The North by D. B. John.
  60. To The Edge Of The World by Julia Green.
  61. The List by Mick Herron.
  62. One Clear Ice-Cold January Morning At The Beginning Of The Twenty-First Century by Roland Schimmerlpfennig.
  63. A New Politics From The Left by Hilary Wainwright.
  64. The Golden Child by Wendy James.
  65. Natboff! One Million Years Of Stupidity by Andy Stanton.
  66. Come And Find Me by Sarah Hilary.
  67. Directorate S: The CIA And America’s Secret Wars In Afghanistan And Pakistan, 2001 – 2016 by Steve Coll.
  68. Night Of The Party by Tracey Mathias.
  69. The Woman In The Mirror by Rebecca James.
  70. The Power Of Yes by Abbie Headon.
  71. The Case For A Maximum Wage by Sam Pizzigati.
  72. This Is What Happened by Mick Herron.
  73. Will Big Business Destroy Our Planet? by Peter Dauvergne.
  74. The Joneses & The Pirateers: Search For The Phantom Lady by S. L. Westgate.
  75. Lean Six Sigma For Leaders by Martin Brenig-Jones and Jo Dowdall.
  76. Run, Riot by Nikesh Shukla.
  77. The Real Politics Of The Horn Of Africa by Alex de Waal.
  78. One Way by S. J. Morden.
  79. All Systems Red by Martha Wells.
  80. Embassy Of The Dead by Will Mabbitt.
  81. Taylor & Rose Secret Agents: Peril In Paris by Katherine Woodfine.
  82. Do Central Banks Serve The People? By Peter Dietsch, François Claveau and Clément Fontan.
  83. The Shock Doctrine Of The Left by Graham Jones.
  84. Wrong Way Home by Isabelle Grey.
  85. Sweet Pea by C. J. Skuse.
  86. In Bloom by C. J. Skuse.
  87. Age Of Assassins by R J Barker.
  88. Bad Blood by E. O. Chirovici.
  89. The Ninth Rain by Jen Williams.
  90. Happyville High: Geek Tragedy by Tom McLaughlin.
  91. A Treachery Of Spies by Manda Scott.
  92. The 57 Bus: A True Story Of Two Teenagers And The Crime That Changed Their Lives by Dashka Slater.
  93. The Broken Ladder: How Inequality Changes The Way We Think, Live And Die by Keith Payne.
  94. Phantom by Leo Hunt.
  95. A Double Life by Flynn Berry.
  96. The Court Of Broken Knives by Anna Smith Spark.
  97. Under The Pendulum Sun by Jeanette Ng.
  98. The Hunger by Alma Katsu.
  99. The Goose Road by Rowena House.
  100. The Grey Bastards by Jonathan French.
  101. The Seven Deaths Of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton.
  102. Solomon Creed by Simon Toyne.
  103. Lethal White by Robert Galbraith.
  104. The Quaker by Liam McIlvanney.
  105. All The Hidden Truths by Claire Askew.
  106. The Traitors: A True Story Of Blood, Betrayal And Deceit by Josh Ireland.
  107. The Boy Who Saw by Simon Toyne.
  108. Firefly by Henry Porter.
  109. Cross Her Heart by Sarah Pinborough.
  110. Blood Cruise by Mats Strandberg.
  111. The Chaos Of Now by Erin Lange.
  112. The Anomaly by Michael Rutger.
  113. Dry by Neal Shusterman and Jarrod Shusterman.
  114. Her Every Fear by Peter Swanson.
  115. The Drop by Mick Herron.
  116. The Hope That Kills by Ed James.
  117. Blackwater by James Henry.
  118. The Last Place You Look by Kristen Lepionka.
  119. She’s Not There by Tamsin Grey.
  120. When Conflict Resolution Fails by Oliver Ramsbotham.
  121. In Our Mad And Furious City by Guy Gunaratne.
  122. The Legend Of Kevin by Philip Reeve and Sarah McIntyre.
  123. Yellowhammer by James Henry.
  124. Rosie Loves Jack by Mel Darbon.
  125. Trans Global: Transgender Then, Now And Around The World by Honor Head.
  126. What Is Race? Who Are Racists? Why Does Skin Colour Matter? And Other Big Questions by Claire Heuchan & Nikesh Shukla.
  127. Winnie-The-Pooh Gloom & Doom For Pessimists by A. A. Milne.

Winnie-The-Pooh Gloom & Doom For Pessimists by A. A. Milne

The Blurb On The Back:

’Good morning, Eeyore,’ shouted Piglet.

‘Good morning, Little Piglet,’ said Eeyore.

‘If it is a good a good morning,’ he said.

‘Which I doubt,’ said he.

‘Not that it matters,’ he said.

This gently-humorous collection of A. A. Milne’s most melancholy moanings will bring a smile to the face of even the grumpiest Eeyore. 

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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What Is Race? Who Are Racists? Why Does Skin Colour Matter? And Other Big Questions by Claire Heuchan & Nikesh Shukla

The Blurb On The Back:

Why is it important to talk about race?

How does it feel to experience racism?

Why does skin colour matter?

Talking about race is often discouraged, but in this book we’re aiming to bring everyone into the conversation.  We explore the history of race and society and discuss how racist attitudes come into being.  We look at belonging and identity, the damaging effects of stereotyping and the benefits of positive representation.  We talk about why its important to identify and challenge racist behaviour, wherever it exists.

Together with contributions from a range of writers of colour, including Inua Ellams, Derek Owusu, Nadine Aisha Jassat, Asim Chaudhry, Wei Ming Kam, Chitra Ramaswamy and Becky Olaniyi, we talk about our experiences relating to race and racism and discuss why skin colour matters.

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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Trans Global: Transgender Then, Now And Around The World by Honor Head

The Blurb On The Back:

TRANS GLOBAL explores the fascinating long history of transgender around the world. This book uncovers the cultures and people of the past and present who have embraced, challenged or quietly subverted society’s expectations about gender. Find out:

– which cultures accepted a non-binary lifestyle for centuries before ‘transgender’ became a label;

– who fights for the acceptance of the trans community;

– what it is like for young trans people just starting out on their journey. 

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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Rosie Loves Jack by Mel Darbon

The Blurb On The Back:

They can’t send you away. What will we do? We need us. I stop your angry, Jack. And you make me strong. You make me Rosie.

Rosie loves Jack. Jack loves Rosie.

So when they’re separated, Rosie will do anything to find the boy who makes the sun shine in her head.

Even run away from home.

Even struggle across London and travel to Brighton, though the trains are cancelled and the snow is falling.

Even though people might think a girl with Down’s syndrome could never survive on her own.

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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Yellowhammer by James Henry

The Blurb On The Back:

July 1983, Essex.  Fox Farm is, thanks to two corpses, neither picturesque nor peaceful. The body in its kitchen belongs to eminent historian Christopher Cliff, who has taken his own life with an antique shotgun.  The second, found on the property boundary, remains unidentified.

DI Nick Lowry’s summer is neither sleepy nor serene. And the two deaths are just the half of it.  The fact County Chief Merrydown was a college friend of Cliff’s means Lowry is now, in turn, under scrutiny from his severely stressed and singularly unsympathetic boss, Sparks.

To catalyse his investigation, Lowry enlists the services of DC Daniel Kenton and WPC Jane Gabriel.  Gabriel needs direction, if she is to begin a career as a detective.  While Kenton, who appears solely focused on beginning a relationship with Gabriel, needs distraction.

Both the heat and the investigation soon intensify. The team find themselves interrogating enigmatic neighbours, shady businessmen, jilted lovers and wronged relatives; all the while negotiating the caprices of Sparks – whose attitudes remain as dated as Fox Farm’s antiques.

Only when they fully open their eyes and minds will they begin to see a web of rural politics, dodgy dealings and fragmented families – one that they must unpick before it ensnares them.  

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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The Legend Of Kevin by Philip Reeve and Sarah McIntyre

The Blurb On The Back:

Is it a bird?

Is it a plane?

No, it’s Kevin!

Kevin the flying pony blows in on a magical storm and – DOOF – crashes into the balcony outside Max’s flat.

As the storm waters rise and the town is besieged by creatures (naughty sea monkeys ahoy-eep-eep!) Max and Kevin set about putting things right.

With Max’s quick thinking and a constant supply of biscuits for Kevin, there’s nothing this heroic duo can’t achieve! 

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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In Our Mad And Furious City by Guy Gunaratne

The Blurb On The Back:

For Selvon, Ardan and Yusuf, growing up under the towers of Stones Estate, summer means what it does anywhere: football, music, freedom. But now, after the killing of a British soldier, riots are spreading across the city, and nowhere is safe.

While the fury swirls around them, Selvon and Ardan remain focused on their own obsessions, girls and grime. Their friend Yusuf is caught up in a different tide: radicalism is sweeping his local mosque, and he’ll do anything to protect his troubled older brother, Irfan, from it.

As the voices of Nelson and Caroline echo with a previous generation’s experience of violence and extremism, the story spirals towards its devastating conclusion. 

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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When Conflict Resolution Fails by Oliver Ramsbotham

The Blurb On The Back:

Bringing warring parties to the negotiating table is the aim of any peace process. But what happens when those negotiations falter and conflict resolution fails? Is everything lost, or are there prospects for meaningful change in even the most intractable of conflicts?

In this insightful book, leading scholar-practitioner in conflict resolution Oliver Ramsbotham explores the phenomenon of radical disagreement as the main impediment to negotiation, problem-solving and dialogue between conflict parties. Taking as his focus the long-running and seemingly irresolvable conflict between Israel and Palestine, he shows how what is needed in these circumstances is not less radical disagreement, but more. Only by understanding what is blocking the way and by promoting collective strategic engagement within, across and between the groups involved can deadlock be transformed.

Rich in detail and accessibly written, this book introduces a new and as yet relatively unexplored frontier in conflict studies. Its wider application to other phases, levels and war zones holds out rich promise for extending conflict engagement in some of the world’s deadliest and most difficult hot spots. 

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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She’s Not There by Tamsin Grey

The Blurb On The Back:

When Jonah and Raff wake up on Monday, their mother Lucy isn’t there.

Although Jonah is only nine, he is the big brother, and knows enough about the world to keep her absence a secret. If anyone found out she’d left them alone, it could be disastrous for him and Raff; and she’ll be back, he’s nearly sure.

With growing unease, he puzzles over the clues she’s left behind. Who sent her the flowers Why are all her shoes still in the house? Why is her phone buried in a plant pot?

And who, in their diverse south London community, might know more about her than he does? 

The Review (Cut For Spoilers):

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