Maid: Hard Work, Low Pay And A Mother’s Will To Survive by Stephanie Land

The Blurb On The Back:

”My daughter learned to walk in a homeless shelter.”

As a struggling single mum, determined to keep a roof over her daughter’s head, Stephanie Land worked for years as a maid, working long hours in order to provide for her small family.

As she worked hard to climb her way out of poverty as a single parent, scrubbing the toilets of the wealthy, navigating domestic labour jobs as a cleaner whilst also juggling higher education, assisted housing, and a tangled web of government assistance, Stephanie wrote.  She wrote the true stories that weren’t being told.  The stories of the overworked and underpaid. 

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Money In The Morgue by Ngaio Marsh and Stella Duffy

The Blurb On The Back:

It’s business as usual for Mr Glossop as he does his regular rounds delivering wages to the government buildings scattered across New Zealand’s desolate Canterbury plains.  But when his car breaks down he is stranded for the night at the lonely Mount Seaver Hospital, with the telephone lines down, a storm on its way and the nearby river about to burst its banks.

Trapped with him at Mount Seager are a group of quarantined soldiers with a serious case of cabin fever; three young employees embroiled in a tense love triangle, a dying elderly man, an elusive patient whose origins remain a mystery … and a potential killer.

When the payroll disappears from a locked safe and the hospital’s death toll starts to rise faster than normal, can the appearance of an English detective working in counterespionage be just a lucky coincidence – or is something more sinister afoot? 

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Pride: The Story Of The LGBTQ Equality Movement by Matthew Todd

The Blurb On The Back:

In June 1969, police raided New York gay bar The Stonewall Inn, and the LGBTQ equality movement was born.  Pride charts the events of that night in New York, the days and nights of rioting that followed, the ensuing organisation of the LGBTQ community – and the 50 years that followed in which activists and ordinary people have dedicated their lives to reversing the global position.

Pride documents the milestones in the fight for LGBTQ+ equality, from the victories of early activists to the passing of legislation barring discrimination, and the gradual acceptance of the LTBTQ community in politics, spot, culture and the media.  Rare images and documents cover the seminal moments, events and breakthroughs of the movement, while personal testimonies share the voices of key figures on a broad range of topics, including Maureen Duffy on the early days of the movement, Asifa Lahore on religion, Jake Shears on music, Will Young on mental health and Paris Lees on trans representation.  Pride is a unique celebration of LGBTQ cultures, an account of the ongoing challenges facing the community, and a testament to the equal rights that have been won for many as a result of the passion and determination of this mass movement.

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The End Of Aspiration by Duncan Exley

The Blurb On The Back:

Why is it getting harder to secure a job that matches our qualifications, buy a home of our own and achieve financial stability?

Underprivileged people have always faced barriers, but people from middle-income families are increasingly more likely to slide down the social scale than climb up.

Duncan Exley draws on expert research and real-life experiences – including from an actor, a politician, a billionaire entrepreneur and a surgeon – to issue a wake-up call to break through segregated opportunity.  He offers a manifesto to reboot our prospects and benefit all.

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Asia’s Reckoning: China, Japan, The US And The Struggle For Global Power by Richard McGregor

The Blurb On The Back:

The dramatic story of the relationship between the world’s three largest economies, by one of the foremost experts on East Asia. 

For more than half a century, American power in the Pacific has successfully kept the peace.  But it has also cemented the toxic rivalry between China and Japan, consumed with endless history wars and entrenched political dynasties.  Now, the combination of these forces with Donald Trump’s unpredictable impulses and disdain for America’s old alliances threatens to upend the region.  If the United States helped lay the post-war foundations for modern Asia, Asia’s Reckoning will reveal how that structure is now crumbling.

With unrivalled access to US and Asian archives, as well as many of the major players in all three countries, Richard McGregor shows how the confrontational course on which China and Japan have increasingly set themselves is no simple spat between neighbours.  And the fallout would be a political and economic tsunami for all of us.  

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The Deathless Girls by Kiran Millwood Hargrave

The Blurb On The Back:

”I used to think to make people feel afraid was a curse, an awful thing … But I’d love for them to fear me … I want them to look at me and weep.”

On the even of their divining, the day Lil and her twin sister Kizzy are to discover their fate, they’re captured and enslaved by the cruel Boyar Vallarta.

Far away from their beloved Traveller community, and forced to work in the harsh castle kitchens, Lil finds some comfort in the storm-eyed Mira, a fellow slave who she’s drawn to in ways she doesn’t understand.  But too soon she also learns about the Dragon, a mysterious and terrifying man of myth, who takes girls as gifts.

They may not have had their divining day, but the girls will still discover their fate …  

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Why Cities Look The Way They Do by Richard J Williams

The Blurb On The Back:

We tend to think cities look the way they do because of the conscious work of architects, planners and builders.  But what if the look of cities had less to do with design, and more to do with social, cultural, financial and political processes, and the way ordinary citizens interact with them?  What if the city is a process as much as a design?  Richard J Williams takes the moment construction is finished as a beginning, tracing the myriad processes that produce the look of the contemporary global city.

This book is the story of dramatic but unforeseen urban sights: how financial capital spawns empty towering skyscrapers and hollowed-out ghettoes; how the zoning of once-illicit sexual practices in marginal areas of the city results in the reinvention of culturally vibrant gay villages; how abandoned factories have been repurposed as creative hubs in a precarious postindustrial economy.  It is also the story of how popular urban cliches and the fictional portrayal of cities powerfully shape the way we read and see the bricks, concrete and glass that surround us.

Thought-provoking and original, Why Cities Look The Way They Do will appeal to anyone who wants to understand the contemporary city, shedding new light on humanity’s greatest collective invention.

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Stunt Double: Jungle Cruise by Tamsin Cooke

The Blurb On The Back:

Fearless stunt double Finn is in Thailand working on the latest Rio Dining blockbuster.  It’s a dream job, but are the whispers around set true?  Is the film really cursed?

When stunts go wrong it’s serious, and on this movie, they could be deadly.  So far, Finn’s survived all sorts of smashes and crashes, even an elephant stampede, but it’s the secrets on set that might finally break him. 

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White Bodies by Jane Robins

The Blurb On The Back:

Callie loves Tilda.

She’s her sister, after all.  And she’s beautiful and successful.

Tilda loves Felix.

He’s her husband.  Successful and charismatic, he is also controlling, suspicious and, possibly, dangerous.

Still, Tilda loves Felix.

And Callie loves Tilda.  Very, very much.

So she’s made a deal to save her.  But the cost could destroy them both … 

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The Future Of Design by Lorraine Justice

The Blurb On The Back:

There is no blurb on the back, instead you get these quotes:

”A hugely important book that appears at a critical time.”

Bruce Nussbaum, Mentor-in-Residence, New Museum, NYC, former Managing Editor, BusinessWeek

“A must-read for anyone who recognises the need to graduate past a world of objects made of wood and metal, to design experiences that will largely be made out out computer codes.”

John Maeda, Global Head of Computational Design and Inclusion, Automattic, Inc

“An excellent overview of professional design.  It’s an invaluable resource for those interested in pursuing a career in the field or for entrepreneurs looking to harness the power of great design.”

Carole Bilson, President, Design Management Institute

“Lorraine Justice has created a guide that will help designers and those who want to learn what design is and can be.  Her experience as an educator, strategist, and researcher provides the base to describe the who, what, and why in design.”

Craig M. Vogel, FIDSA, FRSA, Associate Dean, College of DAAP, University of Cincinnati

“A timely book for designers, students in design disciplines, business, CEOs, product managers, and team players.”

Min Wang, Professor, Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing China, founding partner, HYVC

“An authoritative and inspiring exploration into the role of design in production and society, technology and the market.” 

Lorenzo Imbesi, PhD, Full Professor of Design, Chair of Sapienza Design Research, Sapienza University of Rome 

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