The Blood Miracles by Lisa McInerney

The Blurb On The Back:

Like all twenty-year-olds, Ryan Cusack is trying to get his head around who he is.  This is not a good time for his boss to exploit his dual heritage by opening a new black market route from Italy to Ireland, it is certainly not a good time for his adored girlfriend to decide he’s irreparably corrupted, and he really wishes he hadn’t accidentally caught the eye of an ornery grandmother who fancies herself his saviour.

There may be a way clear of the chaos in the business proposals of music promoter Colm and in the attention of the charming, impulsive Natalie.  But now that his boss’s ambitions have rattled the city, Ryan is about to find out what he’s made of, and it might be that chaos is in his blood.

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The Glorious Heresies by Lisa McInerney

The Blurb On The Back:

Maureen didn’t mean to kill a man, but what can a poor dear do when she’s surprised by an intruder and has only a holy stone to hand?  Lucky that she’s just reconnected with her estranged son Jimmy because, as the most feared gangster in Cork, he certainly has the tools to sort out the mess.

So Jimmy enlists his boyhood buddy Tony who, with six kids and a love of the bottle, could certainly do with the money, even if his teenage son, Ryan, is far too keen to grow up so he can become a gangster himself.  And all is going to plan until Georgie, the girlfriend of the hapless intruder, starts to wonder where he went …

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Hoffer by Tim Glencross

The Blurb On The Back:

“Beside the sofa was a pooled form.  I’d seen dead bodies before, but there was something different about finding one in my Kensington flat, lazily covered by an old Liberty throw I’d had for years.

Though hardly in the mood, I decided not to cancel my appointment with Roland Turner at the Whig Club.”

William Hoffer – handsome, refined, a little cold perhaps – is an established figure in London society.

But Hoffer has secrets.  He is vague about his Midwestern origins.  The counsel he offers a Russian billionaire may extend to murkier topics than art investments.  Then there is the question of his money, which is running out.

When a ghost from his past in Mexico returns, so do Hoffer’s brutal instincts for self-preservation … 

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